Job satisfaction and expected turnover among federal, state, and local public health practitioners

Jonathon P. Leider, Elizabeth Harper, Ji Won Shon, Katie Sellers, Brian C. Castrucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. To use data on the governmental public health workforce to examine demographics and elucidate drivers of job satisfaction and intent to leave one's organization. Methods. Using microdata from the 2014 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey and 2014 Public Health Workforce Interests andNeeds Survey,we drew comparisons between federal, state, and local public health staff. We fitted logistic regressions to examine correlates of both job satisfaction and intent to leave one's organization within the coming year. Results. Correlates of job satisfaction included pay satisfaction, organizational support, and employee involvement. Approximately 40% of federal, state, and local staff said they were either considering leaving their organization in the next year or were planning to retire by 2020. Conclusions. Public health practitioners largely like their jobs, but many are dissatisfied with their pay and are consideringworking elsewhere.More should be done to understand the determinants of job satisfaction and how to successfully retain high-quality staff. Public Health Implications. Public health is at a crossroads. Significant turnover is expected in the coming years. Retention efforts should engage staff across all levels of public health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1782-1788
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume106
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2016
Externally publishedYes

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