Janitor workload and occupational injuries

Deirdre R. Green, Susan G Gerberich, Hyun Kim, Andrew Ryan, Patricia M McGovern, Timothy R Church, Adam Schwartz, Rony F. Arauz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This study was designed to identify potential effects of workload and sleep on injury occurrence. Methods: Questionnaires were disseminated to janitors in the SEIU Local 26 union; 390 responded and provided information on workload, sleep, and injury outcomes. Quantitative measurements of workload and sleep were collected via FitBit devices from a subset of 58 janitors. Regression techniques were implemented to determine risk. Results: Thirty-seven percent reported increased workload over the study period Adjusted analyses indicated a significant effect of change in workload (RR: 1.94; 95%CI: 1.40-2.70) and sleep hours (RR: 2.21; 95%CI: 1.33-3.66) on occupational injury. Among those with sleep disturbances, injury risk was greater for those with less than five, versus more than five, days of moderate to vigorous physical activity; RR: 2.77; 95%CI: 1.16-6.59). Conclusions: Increased workload and sleep disturbances increased the risk of injury, suggesting employers should address these factors to mitigate occupational injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-232
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Grant sponsor: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health and Human Services; Grant number: T42OH008434. This research was supported by a MCOHS Pilot Projects Research Grant, Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety, Education and Research Center (T42OH008434) funded through: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health and Human Services. Additional support was provided through the University of Minnesota Graduate School, Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. The contents of this effort are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of NIOSH, the University of Minnesota Graduate School, or other associated entities.

Funding Information:
Grant sponsor: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health and Human Services; Grant number: T42OH008434. This research was supported by a MCOHS Pilot Projects Research Grant, Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety, Education and Research Center (T42OH008434) funded through: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health and Human Services. Additional support was provided through the University of Minnesota Graduate School, Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. The contents of this effort are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of NIOSH, the University of Minnesota Graduate School, or other associated entities. A special thanks to the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 26 for their commitment and important contributions to this project. Grant sponsor: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health and Human Services; Grant number: T42OH008434. This research was supported by a MCOHS Pilot Projects Research Grant, Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety, Education and Research Center (T42OH008434) funded through: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health and Human Services. Additional support was provided through the University of Minnesota Graduate School, Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. The contents of this effort are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of NIOSH, the University of Minnesota Graduate School, or other associated entities. Approval to conduct this study was obtained from the Institutional Review Board (IRB), University of Minnesota under the social and behavioral human subjects protocol. Participants provided written consent to participate in the study based on a template from the University of Minnesota IRB. The authors declare no conflicts of interest. Steven B. Markowitz declares that he has no conflict of interest in the review and publication decision regarding this article.

Funding Information:
University of Minnesota Graduate School Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship; National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control, Department of Health and Human Services, Grant number: T42OH008434

Keywords

  • FitBit
  • janitors
  • occupational injuries
  • physical activity
  • sleep quality
  • workload

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