“It’s Like a Cyber-Security Blanket”: The Utility of Remote Activity Monitoring in Family Dementia Care

Lauren L. Mitchell, Colleen M. Peterson, Shaina R. Rud, Eric Jutkowitz, Andrielle Sarkinen, Sierra Trost, Carolyn M. Porta, Jessica M. Finlay, Joseph E. Gaugler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Technologies have emerged that aim to help older persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRDs) remain at home while also supporting their caregiving family members. However, the usefulness of these innovations, particularly in home-based care contexts, remains underexplored. The current study evaluated the acceptability and utility of an in-home remote activity monitoring (RAM) system for 30 family caregivers of persons with ADRD via quantitative survey data collected over a 6-month period and qualitative survey and interview data collected for up to 18 months. A parallel convergent mixed methods design was employed. The integrated qualitative and quantitative data suggested that RAM technology offered ongoing monitoring and provided caregivers with a sense of security. Considerable customization was needed so that RAM was most appropriate for persons with ADRD. The findings have important clinical implications when considering how RAM can supplement, or potentially substitute for, ADRD family care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-98
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7900-1924 Mitchell Lauren L. 1 Peterson Colleen M. 1 Rud Shaina R. 2 Jutkowitz Eric 3 Sarkinen Andrielle 1 Trost Sierra 1 Porta Carolyn M. 1 Finlay Jessica M. 1 Gaugler Joseph E. 1 1 University of Minnesota–Twin Cities, Minneapolis, USA 2 The Alzheimer’s Association, Minnesota–North Dakota Chapter, Minneapolis, USA 3 Brown University, Providence, RI, USA Joseph E. Gaugler, Long-Term Care Professor in Nursing, Director of Graduate Studies, Center on Aging, University of Minnesota–Twin Cities, 6-153 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455-1331, USA. Email: gaug0015@umn.edu 1 2020 39 1 86 98 30 4 2017 16 1 2018 22 1 2018 © The Author(s) 2018 2018 Southern Gerontological Society Technologies have emerged that aim to help older persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRDs) remain at home while also supporting their caregiving family members. However, the usefulness of these innovations, particularly in home-based care contexts, remains underexplored. The current study evaluated the acceptability and utility of an in-home remote activity monitoring (RAM) system for 30 family caregivers of persons with ADRD via quantitative survey data collected over a 6-month period and qualitative survey and interview data collected for up to 18 months. A parallel convergent mixed methods design was employed. The integrated qualitative and quantitative data suggested that RAM technology offered ongoing monitoring and provided caregivers with a sense of security. Considerable customization was needed so that RAM was most appropriate for persons with ADRD. The findings have important clinical implications when considering how RAM can supplement, or potentially substitute for, ADRD family care. remote activity monitoring technology smart home Alzheimer’s disease caregiving dementia Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality https://doi.org/10.13039/100000133 R18 HS022836 typesetter ts1 The authors would like to thank the families who contributed their valuable time to this study. The authors also acknowledge Sharon Blume of The Lutheran Home Association and A. R. Weiler of Healthsense Incorporated for their ongoing assistance. The authors are appreciative of the coordination and data management expertise of Ann Emery, Amanda Weinstein, Aneri Shah, Manisha Shah, and Emily Westphal. Declaration of Conflicting Interests The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. Funding The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This research was supported by Grant R18 HS022836 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and K02 AG029480 to Dr. Gaugler. ORCID iD Lauren L. Mitchell https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7900-1924

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2018.

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • caregiving
  • dementia
  • remote activity monitoring
  • smart home
  • technology

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

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