Isolation or assimilation? A log linear interpretation of Australian marriages, 1947-60, 1975, and 1986

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Abstract

Although Gray has argued that the index of social distance reflects ‘preference factors free of opportunity factors’, that it ‘controls the effects of size’, both its statistical derivation and performance under hypothetical extremes suggest that it is akin to a class of social-mobility-ratio statistics, which principally measure group size and only faintly reflect other factors. An alternative log-linear assimilation model is presented and tested. Multivariate methods neatly decompose the problem to take into account overall secular change, sexual imbalances, country-of-birth preferences or prejudices, as well as sex-specific patterns. Thus, in the Australian case, where Gray concluded that shifting nuptial country-of-birth preferences were primarily a function of changing opportunities, a log-linear analysis shows that, on the contrary, a dramatic rise in marital assimilation occurred in spite of only modest changes in opportunities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-162
Number of pages8
JournalPopulation Studies
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1989

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