Isolates of California encephalitis (La Crosse) virus from field collected eggs and larvae of Aedes triseriatus: identification of the overwintering site of California encephalitis

Henry H. Balfour, Charlene K. Edelman, Ferne E. Cook, William I. Barton, Albert W. Buzicky, Robert A. Siem, Henry Bauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

California encephalitis is caused primarily by La Crosse virus, a mosquito borne agent the vector of which is the mosquito Aedes triseriatus. Once La Crosse virus has been detected in a given geographical area, observations in the same area during subsequent seasons usually have revealed continuing presence of the virus. Field studies were conducted around the homes of children who had California encephalitis in an effort to define the mechanism by which the virus survived the winter. Eggs and larvae of A. triseriatus collected from natural breeding sites during the springs and summers of 1972-1974 were processed for viral isolation. Collections made during 1972 and 1973 yielded no virus. Eggs, obtained on April 29,1974 from a basal tree hole of an American elm located approximately 150 feet from the homes of two children who had had California encephalitis in 1970, contained virus, as did larvae aspirated on May 16, 1974, from the same tree hole. This study in Minnesota confirms previous data from Wisconsin and suggests that La Crosse virus may be passed transovarially in A. triseriatus and may overwinter in the diapause stage of eggs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-716
Number of pages5
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume31
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1975

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