Investigation of the hunger-obesity paradigm among shelter-based homeless women living in Minnesota

Rickelle Richards, Chery Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

A 264-item survey evaluated how two shelter environments influenced homeless women's health (n = 259). Measured heights and weights determined obesity prevalence. Nonparametric tests evaluated body mass index (BMI) and dietary intake data. Principle components analysis reduced the data and correlations were made to BMI and dietary intake. Almost 80% had a BMI ≥ 25 and 67% were food insecure. Median milk intake was significantly different between shelters (1.0 [S1] vs 0.5 [S2], P < 0.05). Most servings were from the fats/sugars group (median servings: 19.6 [S1]; 15.1 [S2], P = 0.73). Obesity is a public health problem among homeless women, with shelter environments limiting the modification of associated risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-359
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 27 2010

Keywords

  • Food availability
  • Food choice
  • Homeless
  • Shelter environment

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