Investigation and modification of available mechanistic–empirical procedures for reflective cracking in asphalt overlays of concrete pavements

Lev Khazanovich, Derek Tompkins, Rongzong Wu, John T. Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In recent decades, state, local, and federal use of asphalt concrete overlays to rehabilitate portland cement concrete pavements has increased significantly. This growth has increased the attention given to mechanistic–empirical modeling of reflective cracking. This paper describes recent research that assessed and modified the state of the art in mechanistic–empirical modeling of reflective cracking. The research reviewed the original Mechanistic–Empirical Pavement Design Guide model and the CalME reflective cracking model. The paper also details research in which the CalME model was modified to facilitate its integration into the design guide for pavement projects of composite asphalt concrete over portland cement concrete.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-132
Number of pages7
JournalTransportation Research Record
Volume2368
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by an FHWA Pooled Fund project, which was funded by the Minnesota Department of Transportation and the California Department of Transportation. The authors thank Nadarajah Sivaneswaran of FHWA and Tim Clyne of the Minnesota Department of Transportation for support and assistance. The authors thank the participants of the SHRP 2 R21 Composite Pavements project for providing R21 AC–PCC data for model validation and thank MnROAD and the University of California Pavement Research Center for help in obtaining pavement data.

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