Investigating the use of circles in social networks to support independence of individuals with autism

Hwajung Hong, Svetlana Yarosh, Jennifer G. Kim, Gregory D. Abowd, Rosa I. Arriaga

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Building social support networks is crucial both for less-independent individuals with autism and for their primary caregivers. In this paper, we describe a four-week exploratory study of a social network service (SNS) that allows young adults with autism to garner support from their family and friends. We explore the unique benefits and challenges of using SNSs to mediate requests for help or advice. In particular, we examine the extent to which specialized features of an SNS can engage users in communicating with their network members to get advice in varied situations. Our findings indicate that technology-supported communication particularly strengthened the relationship between the individual and extended network members, mitigating concerns about over-reliance on primary caregivers. Our work identifies implications for the design of social networking services tailored to meet the needs of this special needs population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI 2013
Subtitle of host publicationChanging Perspectives, Conference Proceedings - The 31st Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Pages3207-3216
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event31st Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Changing Perspectives, CHI 2013 - Paris, France
Duration: Apr 27 2013May 2 2013

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Other

Other31st Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Changing Perspectives, CHI 2013
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period4/27/135/2/13

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Independence
  • Social networks
  • Social support

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