Invasive mold infections in pediatric cancer patients reflect heterogeneity in etiology, presentation, and outcome: A 10-year, single-institution, retrospective study

Sarah P. Georgiadou, Georgios Pongas, Nancy E. Fitzgerald, Russell E. Lewis, Michael Rytting, Edith M. Marom, Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: There is scarcity of data regarding invasive mold infections (IMIs) in children with cancer. Methods: We retrospectively identified patients (18 years old or younger) with malignant disease who developed proven or probable IMIs (European Organization for Research on the Treatment of Cancer/ Mycoses Study Group criteria) during a 10-year period (1998-2008). We reviewed their risk factors and clinical characteristics and assessed their crude mortality rates and treatment outcomes 12 weeks after IMI diagnosis. Results: Forty-eight patients (30 males) were identified, 30 (63%) of whom had a proven IMI. The most prevalent mold were Aspergillus species (40%), followed by Mucorales (20%) and Fusarium species (11%). Acute leukemia was the most common underlying malignancy (39 patients, [81%]). Twenty-three (59%) of them had refractory leukemia. Neutropenia was present at the day of IMI diagnosis in 67% of the patients. Sixty-two percent of the patients received prior corticosteroids. The dominant site of infection was the lungs (79%), followed by skin (29%) and sinuses (10%). Seventy-one percent of patients had radiological findings suggestive of fungal pneumonia (either nodules or masses). The mainstay of antifungal therapy was a lipid formulation of amphotericin B. Antifungal therapy resulted in 54% response rate (33% complete) at 12 weeks. The crude 12-week mortality rate was 31%. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that monocytopenia (P = .013), malnutrition (P = .012), and intensive care admission in the month prior to IMI diagnosis (P = .027) were risk factors for death within 12 weeks. Conclusions: Although Aspergillus spp. was the most common mold in our pediatric cancer population, the epidemiology of the IMIs was diverse. Adults and children share similar risk factors for and epidemiology of IMIs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberpis042
Pages (from-to)125-135
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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