Invading public spaces: Exploring the effects of media type and social prompts on learning outcomes in an interactive environment

Edward P Downs, Sarah Erickson, Jacqueline Borrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 2 × 2, fully-crossed, quasi-experimental design was employed to determine if type of media (rich media vs. lean media) and social prompting (presence of prompts vs. absence of prompts) would differentially impact learning outcomes for patrons interacting with an aquatic invasive species exhibit. Results indicated that the lean-media condition elicited significantly greater learning outcomes than the rich-media condition on two of the three learning measures. The presence of social prompts elicited significantly higher learning outcomes in terms of invasive species identification. The findings are consistent with literature onmedia and learning. Results are discussed for those designing interactive, public spaces for education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-286
Number of pages11
JournalApplied Environmental Education and Communication
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2017

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public space
Design of experiments
Education
learning
invasive species
experimental design
effect
education

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Invading public spaces : Exploring the effects of media type and social prompts on learning outcomes in an interactive environment. / Downs, Edward P; Erickson, Sarah; Borrett, Jacqueline.

In: Applied Environmental Education and Communication, Vol. 16, No. 4, 23.08.2017, p. 276-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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