Interspecific competition between the round goby, Neogobius melanostomus, and the logperch, Percina caprodes, in the Duluth-Superior Harbour

Jared R. Leino, Allen Mensinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Laurentian Great Lakes have been the site of numerous aquatic invasive species such as the sea lamprey, zebra mussel and round goby. To further understand interactions between invasive and native species in situ, competitive interactions between native logperch (Percina caprodes) and invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) were examined using submerged enclosures in the Duluth-Superior Harbour. Experiments were conducted on rocky or sandy substrate throughout the spring and summer months. Trials consisted of single fish, paired conspecifics or round goby/logperch pairs with weight change determined after 28 days. The round gobies were able to outcompete and/or negatively affect logperch on rocky substrates as a direct result of round goby/logperch interactions, as logperch fared well when round gobies were excluded from the enclosures. Although there is evidence that round gobies exclude logperch from rocky substrates, the logperch population remains close to pre-invasion levels in the predominantly soft-bottomed harbour. The continued coexistence of the logperch with the round goby is attributed to the vastly greater area of soft-bottom vs. rocky substrate in the harbour, with the round gobies in the soft bottom younger and smaller than those in the rocky substrate. Recent evidence suggests that the round goby population is declining on the soft substrates indicating that the two populations will continue to coexist in the harbour.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-41
Number of pages8
JournalEcology of Freshwater Fish
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • cage studies
  • competition
  • invasive species
  • lake superior

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