Interrogating the equity principle

The rhetoric and reality of management planning for sustainable archaeological heritage tourism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

International archaeological heritage management in developing countries frequently entails planning for the development of sustainable tourism. A central tenet of sustainable tourism development is the equitable distribution of tourism benefits, a goal reflected in stakeholder consultations and management plan provisions for capacity-building among community members. The lack of longitudinal data demonstrating the meaningful participation of target populations in tourism development dividends, however, calls into question the efficacy of such measures. A review of tourism development outcomes at Machu Picchu, Angkor, Lijiang, Copan, Borobudur and Cape Coast Castle supports the contention that sustainable management planning has not produced equity. The problem lies not in specific planning provisions but in the lack of correspondence between developed country assumptions and developing country reality, which is characterized by structural and systemic power imbalances. The cases inform the creation of a generalizable model of tourism development inequality, the implications of which present philosophical, professional, methodological and conceptual challenges that must be overcome if the heritage management discipline is to deliver on the promise of sustainability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-123
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Heritage Tourism
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

heritage tourism
tourism development
equity
ecotourism
developing world
capacity building
stakeholder
tourism
sustainability
planning
Equity
Tourism development
Archaeology
Rhetoric
Heritage tourism
Planning
Heritage Tourism
Tourism
coast
Developing countries

Keywords

  • Equity
  • Heritage management
  • Planning
  • Preservation
  • Sustainability
  • World heritage sites

Cite this

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abstract = "International archaeological heritage management in developing countries frequently entails planning for the development of sustainable tourism. A central tenet of sustainable tourism development is the equitable distribution of tourism benefits, a goal reflected in stakeholder consultations and management plan provisions for capacity-building among community members. The lack of longitudinal data demonstrating the meaningful participation of target populations in tourism development dividends, however, calls into question the efficacy of such measures. A review of tourism development outcomes at Machu Picchu, Angkor, Lijiang, Copan, Borobudur and Cape Coast Castle supports the contention that sustainable management planning has not produced equity. The problem lies not in specific planning provisions but in the lack of correspondence between developed country assumptions and developing country reality, which is characterized by structural and systemic power imbalances. The cases inform the creation of a generalizable model of tourism development inequality, the implications of which present philosophical, professional, methodological and conceptual challenges that must be overcome if the heritage management discipline is to deliver on the promise of sustainability.",
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