Interpreting historical, botanical, and geological evidence to aid preparations for future floods

Bruno Wilhelm, Juan Antonio Ballesteros Cánovas, Neil Macdonald, Willem H.J. Toonen, Victor Baker, Mariano Barriendos, Gerardo Benito, Achim Brauer, Juan Pablo Corella, Rhawn Denniston, Rüdiger Glaser, Monica Ionita, Michael Kahle, Tao Liu, Marc Luetscher, Mark Macklin, Manfred Mudelsee, Samuel Munoz, Lothar Schulte, Scott St. GeorgeMarkus Stoffel, Oliver Wetter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

River flooding is among the most destructive of natural hazards globally, causing widespread loss of life, damage to infrastructure and economic deprivation. Societies are currently under increasing threat from such floods, predominantly from increasing exposure of people and assets in flood‐prone areas, but also as a result of changes in flood magnitude, frequency, and timing. Accurate flood hazard and risk assessment are therefore crucial for the sustainable development of societies worldwide. With a paucity of hydrological measurements, evidence from the field offers the only insight into truly extreme events and their variability in space and time. Historical, botanical, and geological archives have increasingly been recognized as valuable sources of extreme flood event information. These different archives are here reviewed with a particular focus on the recording mechanisms of flood information, the historical development of the methodological approaches and the type of information that those archives can provide. These studies provide a wealthy dataset of hundreds of historical and palaeoflood series, whose analysis reveals a noticeable dominance of records in Europe. After describing the diversity of flood information provided by this dataset, we identify how these records have improved and could further improve flood hazard assessments and, thereby, flood management and mitigation plans.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1318
JournalWiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 24 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This publication is a contribution to the Past Global Changes (PAGES) Floods Working Group. PAGES is supported by the US National Science Foundation and the Swiss Academy of Sciences. In addition, the publication has been inspired by the “Cross-community workshop on past flood variability” of the PAGES Floods Working Group that held in Grenoble, France, June 27–30, 2016. The meeting has been generously supported by Past Global Changes, Labex OSUG@2020 (Investissements d'avenir – ANR10 LABX56), European Geosciences Union, Grenoble-INP and Université Grenoble Alpes. The worldwide overview of historical and paleoflood records shown in Figure 6 was made possible thanks to many contributors that we warmly thanked. Further contributions are still warmly welcome as they will enable to update the interactive meta-database (http://pastglobalchanges.org/ini/wg/floods/wp1/data). The authors are very grateful to the Editor Stuart Lane for the invitation to submit this manuscript and to Eric Gaume and the anonymous reviewer for their constructive comments.

Funding Information:
This publication is a contribution to the Past Global Changes (PAGES) Floods Working Group. PAGES is supported by the US National Science Foundation and the Swiss Academy of Sciences. In addition, the publication has been inspired by the “Cross-community workshop on past flood variability” of the PAGES Floods Working Group that held in Grenoble, France, June 27–30, 2016. The meeting has been generously supported by Past Global Changes, Labex OSUG@2020 (Investissements d'avenir – ANR10 LABX56), European Geosciences Union, Grenoble-INP and Université Grenoble Alpes. The worldwide overview of historical and paleoflood records shown in Figure 6 was made possible thanks to many contribu-tors that we warmly thanked. Further contributions are still warmly welcome as they will enable to update the interactive meta-database (http://pastglobalchanges.org/ini/wg/floods/wp1/data). The authors are very grateful to the Editor Stuart Lane for the invitation to submit this manuscript and to Eric Gaume and the anonymous reviewer for their constructive comments.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Keywords

  • Flood hazard
  • historical archive
  • natural archive
  • palaeoflood evidence

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Interpreting historical, botanical, and geological evidence to aid preparations for future floods'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this