Interparental Violence and Childhood Adjustment: How and Why Maternal Sensitivity Is a Protective Factor

Liviah G. Manning, Patrick T. Davies, Dante Cicchetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined sensitive parenting as a protective factor in relations between interparental violence (IPV) and children's coping and psychological adjustment. Using a multimethod approach, a high-risk sample of 201 two-year-olds and their mothers participated in three annual waves of data collection. Moderator analyses revealed that sensitive parenting buffered the risk posed by IPV on children's changes in externalizing and prosocial development over a 2-year period. Tests of mediated moderation further indicated that sensitive parenting protected children from the vulnerability of growing up in a violent home through its association with lower levels of children's angry reactivity to interparental conflict. Results highlight the significance of identifying the mechanisms that mediate protective factors in models of family adversity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2263-2278
Number of pages16
JournalChild development
Volume85
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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