International law of economic, social, and cultural rights: A U.S. perspective

David Weissbrodt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The first part of this chapter traces the history of the U.S. approach to international law, particularly in regard to economic, social, and cultural rights and notes the important role that the United States has played in the development of relevant international human rights treaties and institutions. The second part shows that the United States has been, nonetheless, extraordinarily reluctant to submit itself to legal obligations under those treaties, related standards, and institutions. The third part reflects how U.S. judges have occasionally used international human rights law, including economic, social, and cultural rights. The chapter concludes that the United States and Canada share a legal tradition of protecting human rights, but the United States has more steps to take in bringing its human rights ideals into law and practice - particularly as to economic, social, and cultural rights.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEconomic Rights in Canada and the United States
EditorsRhoda E. Howard-Hassmann, Claude E. Welch, Jr.
PublisherUniversity of Pennsylvania Press
Pages41-54
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9780812220933
StatePublished - 2010

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