Intermediate stress effect in reverse: Strength anisotropy

J. P. Meyer, J. F. Labuz, Q. Lin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Because rock is typically sampled in the form of a right circular cylinder, it is convenient from a laboratory testing perspective to produce failure by the application of an axi-symmetric state of stress called triaxial compression, where the major principal stress σI = σa the axial stress, and the intermediate and minor principal stresses σII = σIII = σr the radial stress. For isotropic rock, compression testing σI > σII = σIII leads to a conservative estimate of strength parameters, as opposed to triaxial extension, where σI = σII > σIII. However, it is shown that even though a rock may exhibit only slight (< 10%) elastic anisotropy, anomalous behavior can occur in strength testing such that a "reverse" intermediate stress effect appears.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication46th US Rock Mechanics / Geomechanics Symposium 2012
Pages187-190
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2012
Event46th US Rock Mechanics / Geomechanics Symposium 2012 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jun 24 2012Jun 27 2012

Publication series

Name46th US Rock Mechanics / Geomechanics Symposium 2012
Volume1

Other

Other46th US Rock Mechanics / Geomechanics Symposium 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period6/24/126/27/12

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