Intergenerational transmission of family meal patterns from adolescence to parenthood: Longitudinal associations with parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being

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Abstract

Objective The present study examined longitudinal associations between four family meal patterns (i.e. never had regular family meals, started having regular family meals, stopped having regular family meals, maintained having regular family meals) and young adult parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being. In addition, family meal patterns of parents were compared with those of non-parents. Design Analysis of data from the longitudinal Project EAT (Eating and Activity in Adolescents and Young Adults) study. Linear and logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between family meal patterns and parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being. Setting School and in-home settings. Subjects At baseline (1998; EAT-I), adolescents (n 4746) from socio-economically and racially/ethnically diverse households completed a survey and anthropometric measurements at school. At follow-up (2015; EAT-IV), participants who were parents (n 726) and who were non-parents with significant others (n 618) completed an online survey. Results Young adult parents who reported having regular family meals as an adolescent and as a parent ('maintainers'), or who started having regular family meals with their own families ('starters'), reported more healthful dietary, weight-related and psychosocial outcomes compared with young adults who never reported having regular family meals ('nevers'; P<0·05). In addition, parents were more likely to be family meal starters than non-parents. Conclusions Results suggest that mental and physical health benefits of having regular family meals may be realized as a parent whether the routine of regular family meals is carried forward from adolescence into parenthood, or if the routine is started in parenthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-308
Number of pages10
JournalPublic health nutrition
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Meals
Parents
Weights and Measures
Young Adult
Insurance Benefits
Longitudinal Studies
Linear Models
Mental Health
Eating
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Dietary intake
  • Family meal patterns
  • Longitudinal
  • Obesity
  • Parenthood
  • Psychosocial well-being

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Cite this

@article{e21e5387faef433c93d6ed8d2601f4b0,
title = "Intergenerational transmission of family meal patterns from adolescence to parenthood: Longitudinal associations with parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being",
abstract = "Objective The present study examined longitudinal associations between four family meal patterns (i.e. never had regular family meals, started having regular family meals, stopped having regular family meals, maintained having regular family meals) and young adult parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being. In addition, family meal patterns of parents were compared with those of non-parents. Design Analysis of data from the longitudinal Project EAT (Eating and Activity in Adolescents and Young Adults) study. Linear and logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between family meal patterns and parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being. Setting School and in-home settings. Subjects At baseline (1998; EAT-I), adolescents (n 4746) from socio-economically and racially/ethnically diverse households completed a survey and anthropometric measurements at school. At follow-up (2015; EAT-IV), participants who were parents (n 726) and who were non-parents with significant others (n 618) completed an online survey. Results Young adult parents who reported having regular family meals as an adolescent and as a parent ('maintainers'), or who started having regular family meals with their own families ('starters'), reported more healthful dietary, weight-related and psychosocial outcomes compared with young adults who never reported having regular family meals ('nevers'; P<0·05). In addition, parents were more likely to be family meal starters than non-parents. Conclusions Results suggest that mental and physical health benefits of having regular family meals may be realized as a parent whether the routine of regular family meals is carried forward from adolescence into parenthood, or if the routine is started in parenthood.",
keywords = "Dietary intake, Family meal patterns, Longitudinal, Obesity, Parenthood, Psychosocial well-being",
author = "Berge, {Jerica M} and Jonathan Miller and Allison Watts and Larson, {Nicole I} and Katie Loth and Neumark-Sztainer, {Dianne R}",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S1368980017002270",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "299--308",
journal = "Public Health Nutrition",
issn = "1368-9800",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "2",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Intergenerational transmission of family meal patterns from adolescence to parenthood

T2 - Longitudinal associations with parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being

AU - Berge, Jerica M

AU - Miller, Jonathan

AU - Watts, Allison

AU - Larson, Nicole I

AU - Loth, Katie

AU - Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne R

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Objective The present study examined longitudinal associations between four family meal patterns (i.e. never had regular family meals, started having regular family meals, stopped having regular family meals, maintained having regular family meals) and young adult parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being. In addition, family meal patterns of parents were compared with those of non-parents. Design Analysis of data from the longitudinal Project EAT (Eating and Activity in Adolescents and Young Adults) study. Linear and logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between family meal patterns and parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being. Setting School and in-home settings. Subjects At baseline (1998; EAT-I), adolescents (n 4746) from socio-economically and racially/ethnically diverse households completed a survey and anthropometric measurements at school. At follow-up (2015; EAT-IV), participants who were parents (n 726) and who were non-parents with significant others (n 618) completed an online survey. Results Young adult parents who reported having regular family meals as an adolescent and as a parent ('maintainers'), or who started having regular family meals with their own families ('starters'), reported more healthful dietary, weight-related and psychosocial outcomes compared with young adults who never reported having regular family meals ('nevers'; P<0·05). In addition, parents were more likely to be family meal starters than non-parents. Conclusions Results suggest that mental and physical health benefits of having regular family meals may be realized as a parent whether the routine of regular family meals is carried forward from adolescence into parenthood, or if the routine is started in parenthood.

AB - Objective The present study examined longitudinal associations between four family meal patterns (i.e. never had regular family meals, started having regular family meals, stopped having regular family meals, maintained having regular family meals) and young adult parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being. In addition, family meal patterns of parents were compared with those of non-parents. Design Analysis of data from the longitudinal Project EAT (Eating and Activity in Adolescents and Young Adults) study. Linear and logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between family meal patterns and parents' dietary intake, weight-related behaviours and psychosocial well-being. Setting School and in-home settings. Subjects At baseline (1998; EAT-I), adolescents (n 4746) from socio-economically and racially/ethnically diverse households completed a survey and anthropometric measurements at school. At follow-up (2015; EAT-IV), participants who were parents (n 726) and who were non-parents with significant others (n 618) completed an online survey. Results Young adult parents who reported having regular family meals as an adolescent and as a parent ('maintainers'), or who started having regular family meals with their own families ('starters'), reported more healthful dietary, weight-related and psychosocial outcomes compared with young adults who never reported having regular family meals ('nevers'; P<0·05). In addition, parents were more likely to be family meal starters than non-parents. Conclusions Results suggest that mental and physical health benefits of having regular family meals may be realized as a parent whether the routine of regular family meals is carried forward from adolescence into parenthood, or if the routine is started in parenthood.

KW - Dietary intake

KW - Family meal patterns

KW - Longitudinal

KW - Obesity

KW - Parenthood

KW - Psychosocial well-being

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U2 - 10.1017/S1368980017002270

DO - 10.1017/S1368980017002270

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VL - 21

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JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

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