Interference control in a new rule use task: Age-related changes, labeling, and attention

Ulrich Müller, Philip David Zelazo, Suzanne Hood, Tullia Leone, Lisa Rohrer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

86 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three experiments examined 3- to 6-year-olds' interference control using a task in which children saw 2 corresponding sets of colored cards, a large set in front of them and a small set behind them. A colored candy (Smartie) was placed on a large card with mismatching color, and children could win the Smartie by selecting the small card that matched the color of the large card. Three-year-olds performed poorly whereas older children performed well. Having children label the correct color before responding improved 3-year-olds' performance (Experiment 2), as did pointing to the large card (Experiment 3); decreasing the affective salience of the stimuli (colored beads vs. Smarties) did not (Experiment 3). Results reveal the role of selective attention in action control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1594-1609
Number of pages16
JournalChild development
Volume75
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2004

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