Interactive storytelling environments: Coping with cardiac illness at Boston's Children's Hospital

Marina Umaschi Bers, Edith Ackermann, Justine Cassell, Beth Donegan, Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, David Ray DeMaso, Carol Strohecker, Sarah Lualdi, Dennis Bromley, Judith Karlin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes exploration of uses of a computational storytelling environment on the Cardiology Unit of the Children's Hospital in Boston during the summer of 1997. Young cardiac patients ranging from age 7 to 16 used the SAGE environment to tell personal stories and create interactive characters, as a way of coping with cardiac illness, hospitalizations, and invasive medical procedures. This pilot study is part of a larger collaborative effort between Children's Hospital and MERL - A Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratory to develop a web-based application, the Experience Journal, to assist patients and their families in dealing with serious medical illness. The focus of the paper is on young patients' uses of SAGE, on SAGE's affordances in the context of the hospital, and on design recommendations for the development of future computational play kits. Preliminary analysis of children's stories indicates that children used different modes of interaction - direct, mediated, and differed - depending upon what personae the narrator chooses to take on. These modes seem to vary with the mindset and health condition of the child.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
PublisherACM
Pages603-610
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
EventProceedings of the 1998 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI - Los Angeles, CA, USA
Duration: Apr 18 1998Apr 23 1998

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1998 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI
CityLos Angeles, CA, USA
Period4/18/984/23/98

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