Integrating remote sensing with ecology and evolution to advance biodiversity conservation

Jeannine Cavender-Bares, Fabian D. Schneider, Maria João Santos, Amanda Armstrong, Ana Carnaval, Kyla M. Dahlin, Lola Fatoyinbo, George C. Hurtt, David Schimel, Philip A. Townsend, Susan L. Ustin, Zhihui Wang, Adam M. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Remote sensing has transformed the monitoring of life on Earth by revealing spatial and temporal dimensions of biological diversity through structural, compositional and functional measurements of ecosystems. Yet, many aspects of Earth’s biodiversity are not directly quantified by reflected or emitted photons. Inclusive integration of remote sensing with field-based ecology and evolution is needed to fully understand and preserve Earth’s biodiversity. In this Perspective, we argue that multiple data types are necessary for almost all draft targets set by the Convention on Biological Diversity. We examine five key topics in biodiversity science that can be advanced by integrating remote sensing with in situ data collection from field sampling, experiments and laboratory studies to benefit conservation. Lowering the barriers for bringing these approaches together will require global-scale collaboration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)506-519
Number of pages14
JournalNature Ecology and Evolution
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We are presenters at the World Biodiversity Symposia on Earth Observations and Biodiversity. The World Biodiversity Forum held 23–28 February 2020 in Davos (Switzerland) brought together biodiversity scientists and remote sensing experts to address these questions, through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) symposium on Using Earth Observations to Understand Changes in Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function (NASA NNH19ZDA001N-TWSC) and the ESA-supported symposium Remote Sensing for Biodiversity Monitoring. Further support was provided by the NSF RCN project Cross-Scale Processes Impacting Biodiversity (DEB-1745562), NSF BII ASCEND (DBI-2021898), NSF DEB-1702379, NSF DEB-1638720, NASA Biodiversity (0048NNH20ZDA001N, 20-BIODIV20-0048, 20-ECOF20-0008), NASA BioSCape (80NSSC21K0086), NASA-CMS (80NSSC17K0710, 80NSSC21K1059), NASA-IDS (80NSSC17K0348) and the NASA Ecological Forecasting Team Applied Sciences Program (80NSSC19K0205). The research carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, was under a contract with NASA (80NM0018D0004). Government sponsorship is acknowledged. The research conducted at the University of Zurich was supported by the University Research Priority Program in Global Change and Biodiversity. The GOSIF GPP product was obtained from http://globalecology.unh.edu . The artwork in Fig. was drawn by D. Tschanz.

Funding Information:
We are presenters at the World Biodiversity Symposia on Earth Observations and Biodiversity. The World Biodiversity Forum held 23–28 February 2020 in Davos (Switzerland) brought together biodiversity scientists and remote sensing experts to address these questions, through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) symposium on Using Earth Observations to Understand Changes in Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function (NASA NNH19ZDA001N-TWSC) and the ESA-supported symposium Remote Sensing for Biodiversity Monitoring. Further support was provided by the NSF RCN project Cross-Scale Processes Impacting Biodiversity (DEB-1745562), NSF BII ASCEND (DBI-2021898), NSF DEB-1702379, NSF DEB-1638720, NASA Biodiversity (0048NNH20ZDA001N, 20-BIODIV20-0048, 20-ECOF20-0008), NASA BioSCape (80NSSC21K0086), NASA-CMS (80NSSC17K0710, 80NSSC21K1059), NASA-IDS (80NSSC17K0348) and the NASA Ecological Forecasting Team Applied Sciences Program (80NSSC19K0205). The research carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, was under a contract with NASA (80NM0018D0004). Government sponsorship is acknowledged. The research conducted at the University of Zurich was supported by the University Research Priority Program in Global Change and Biodiversity. The GOSIF GPP product was obtained from http://globalecology.unh.edu. The artwork in Fig. 1 was drawn by D. Tschanz.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, Springer Nature Limited.

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Ecology
  • Ecosystem
  • Remote Sensing Technology

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Review
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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