Integrating Ecological and Feminist Perspectives to Study Maternal Experiences Feeding Children With Down Syndrome

Emma Marston, Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu, Michele Polfuss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to propose a theoretical framework integrating an ecological model with feminist theory for guiding future research in holistic nursing and healthcare about maternal experiences feeding children with Down syndrome. Background: Children with Down syndrome are at high risk for overweight and obesity, as well as feeding problems. Therefore, healthy weight promotion is crucial for children with Down syndrome. Feeding is one factor that may contribute to child weight. Literature on maternal experiences feeding children with Down syndrome, including the caregiving work involved in feeding, is limited. Methods: In this article, we identify literature gaps related to the topic of maternal experiences feeding children with Down syndrome. We summarize ecological and feminist perspectives and apply these perspectives to the topic to demonstrate the utility of the proposed framework. Implications for Holistic Nursing and Healthcare: Findings from future studies applying this theoretical framework integrating an ecological model with feminist theory will have implications for practice and research in holistic nursing and healthcare. This framework could be also adapted to inform future research focused on other populations or research topics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Holistic Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2024.

Keywords

  • caregivers
  • children
  • disabilities
  • Down syndrome
  • ecological model
  • families
  • feeding
  • feminist theory
  • health promotion/disease prevention

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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