Integrating Autism-Related Symptoms into the Dimensional Internalizing and Externalizing Model of Psychopathology. The TRAILS Study

Arjen Noordhof, Robert F. Krueger, Johan Ormel, Albertine J. Oldehinkel, Catharina A. Hartman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Problems associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) occur frequently in the general population and often co-occur with problems in other domains of psychopathology. In the research presented here these co-occurrence patterns were investigated by integrating a dimensional approach to ASDs into the more general dimensional framework of internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Factor Analysis was used to develop hierarchical and bi-factor models covering multiple domains of psychopathology in three measurement waves of a longitudinal general population sample (N = 2,230, ages 10–17, 50.8 % female). In all adequately fitting models, autism related problems were part of a specific domain of psychopathology that could be distinguished from the internalizing and externalizing domains. Optimal model fit was found for a bi-factor model with one non-specific factor and four specific factors related to internalizing, externalizing, autism spectrum problems and problems related to attention and orientation. Autism-related problems constitute a specific domain of psychopathology that can be distinguished from the internalizing and externalizing domains. In addition, the co-occurrence patterns in the data indicate the presence of a strong general factor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)577-587
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2015

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Comorbidity
  • Confirmatory factor analysis
  • Externalizing psychopathology
  • Internalizing psychopathology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Integrating Autism-Related Symptoms into the Dimensional Internalizing and Externalizing Model of Psychopathology. The TRAILS Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this