Instrument-based assessment of motor function yields no evidence of dyskinesia in adult first-degree biological relatives of individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder

Jerillyn S. Kent, Michael P. Caligiuri, Mallory K. Skorheim, Timothy J. Lano, Vijay A. Mittal, Scott R. Sponheim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is accruing evidence of spontaneous dyskinesia in individuals with schizophrenia that is independent of medication exposure. Dyskinetic motor behavior is also present in individuals who are at high risk of schizophrenia and appears to have prognostic value for the development of psychosis. Nonetheless, it remains unclear whether dyskinesia is present in first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia and thus associated with genetic liability for schizophrenia (i.e., an endophenotype), or whether the motor abnormality is a biomarker specific to the disease state spectrum. There is also limited information about links between dyskinesia and clinically relevant phenomena such as symptoms and cognition. Because dyskinesia marking genetic liability is likely to be subtle, we used sensitive instrument-based measurement of handwriting fluency to quantify dyskinesia in medicated individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, unaffected first-degree biological relatives of individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, and control participants. Results indicated that medicated individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder exhibited more dyskinesia than both relatives and controls, with no difference between relatives and controls. Dyskinesia in individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder was unrelated to current antipsychotic medication dosage, but associated with worse working memory function and greater positive formal thought disorder. These results provide evidence that dyskinesia is not associated with unexpressed genetic liability for schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-140
Number of pages6
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume272
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2019

Keywords

  • Basal ganglia
  • Dyskinesia
  • Endophenotype
  • First-degree biological relatives
  • Genetic liability
  • Psychosis
  • Schizophrenia

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

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