Insight into the effects of plasmodium chabaudi on platelets using carbon-fiber microelectrode amperometry

Kang Xiong-Hang, Kaila Kemnetz-Ness, Anna C. Krieger, Christy L Haynes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Platelets are anuclear circulating cell bodies within the bloodstream commonly known for their roles in clot formation during vascular injury to prevent blood loss. They also have significant impact in a range of diseases, including malaria. However, the role of platelets in malaria is controversial, with contradicting evidence suggesting either that they assist in destruction of malarial parasites or facilitate a severe form of malaria. Precedent work suggests that the timing of infection is critical in determining whether platelets switch roles from being protective to deleterious. As such, the work herein makes use of the unique mechanistic perspective offered by carbon-fiber microelectrode amperometry (CFMA) to understand how platelet secretion is impacted in malarial infection stages (ascending parasite count versus descending parasite count). Malarial platelet behavior was compared to platelets from noninfected control mice by probing their exocytotic function. Results suggest that mouse malaria caused by the parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, during both ascending and descending infection stages, reduces platelet exocytotic events and delays platelet granule fusion; in addition, platelets are more impacted by the disease early in the infection stages. In all, understanding platelet behavior in the malarial context may present new therapeutic routes to treat or cure malaria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)592-597
Number of pages6
JournalACS Infectious Diseases
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 12 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded by the Biotechnology Training Grant NIH T32GM008347 to K.X., a grant from the University of Minnesota’s Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program to K.K., and the NSF REU undergraduate grant CHE-1359181 to A.C.K. The authors would like to thank Sarah M. Gruba for her assistance in the early phase of getting malarial-infected mice and Natalie Hudson-Smith for her assistance in obtaining TEM images of platelets. TEM imaging in this study was carried out in the Characterization Facility, University of Minnesota, which receives partial support from the National Science Foundation through the MRSEC program.

Funding Information:
This work was funded by the Biotechnology Training Grant NIH T32GM008347 to K.X., a grant from the University of Minnesota's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program to K.K., and the NSF REU undergraduate grant CHE-1359181 to A.C.K. The authors would like to thank Sarah M. Gruba for her assistance in the early phase of getting malarial-infected mice and Natalie Hudson-Smith for her assistance in obtaining TEM images of platelets. TEM imaging in this study was carried out in the Characterization Facility, University of Minnesota which receives partial support from the National Science Foundation through the MRSEC program.

Keywords

  • carbon-fiber microelectrode amperometry
  • electrochemical technique
  • infected red blood cells
  • malaria
  • Plasmodium chabaudi
  • platelets
  • single cell

How much support was provided by MRSEC?

  • Shared

Reporting period for MRSEC

  • Period 5

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Insight into the effects of plasmodium chabaudi on platelets using carbon-fiber microelectrode amperometry'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this