Innovative uses of milk protein concentrates in product development

Shantanu Agarwal, Robert L.W. Beausire, Sonia Patel, Hasmukh Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Milk protein concentrates (MPCs) are complete dairy proteins (containing both caseins and whey proteins) that are available in protein concentrations ranging from 42% to 85%. As the protein content of MPCs increases, the lactose levels decrease. MPCs are produced by ultrafiltration or by blending different dairy ingredients. Although ultrafiltration is the preferred method for producing MPCs, they also can be produced by precipitating the proteins out of milk or by dry-blending the milk proteins with other milk components. MPCs are used for their nutritional and functional properties. For example, MPC is high in protein content and averages approximately 365 kcal/100 g. Higher-protein MPCs provide protein enhancement and a clean dairy flavor without adding significant amounts of lactose to food and beverage formulations. MPCs also contribute valuable minerals, such as calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus, to formulations, which may reduce the need for additional sources of these minerals. MPCs are multifunctional ingredients and provide benefits, such as water binding, gelling, foaming, emulsification, and heat stability. This article will review the development of MPCs and milk protein isolates including their composition, production, development, functional benefits, and ongoing research. The nutritional and functional attributes of MPCs are discussed in some detail in relation to their application as ingredients in major food categories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)A23-A29
JournalJournal of food science
Volume80
Issue numberS1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Keywords

  • Food application
  • Functional properties
  • Milk protein concentrate
  • Milk protein isolate
  • Milk proteins

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