Injectable and Repeatable Inductive Heating of Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Enhanced "PHIL" Embolic toward Tumor Treatment

Jacqueline L. Pasek-Allen, Saurin Kantesaria, Lakshya Gangwar, Qi Shao, Zhe Gao, Djaudat Idiyatullin, Zonghu Han, Michael L. Etheridge, Michael Garwood, Bharathi D. Jagadeesan, John C. Bischof

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Deep-seated tumors of the liver, brain, and other organ systems often recur after initial surgical, chemotherapeutic, radiation, or focal treatments. Repeating these treatments is often invasive and traumatic. We propose an iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-enhanced precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid (PHIL, MicroVention inc.) embolic as a localized dual treatment implant for nutrient deprivation and multiple repeatable thermal ablation. Following a single injection, multiple thermal treatments can be repeated as needed, based on monitoring of tumor growth/recurrence. Herein we show the ability to create an injectable stable PHIL-IONP solution, monitor deposition of the PHIL-IONP precipitate dispersion by μCT, and gauge the IONP distribution within the embolic by magnetic resonance imaging. Once precipitated, the implant could be heated to reach therapeutic temperatures >8 °C for thermal ablation (clinical temperature of ∼45 °C), in a model disk and a 3D tumor bed model. Heat output was not affected by physiological conditions, multiple heating sessions, or heating at intervals over a 1 month duration. Further, in ex vivo mice hind-limb tumors, we could noninvasively heat the embolic to an "ablative"temperature elevation of 17 °C (clinically 54 °C) in the first 5 min and maintain the temperature rise over +8 °C (clinically a temperature of 45 °C) for longer than 15 min.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41659-41670
Number of pages12
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume14
Issue number37
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 21 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded by a grant from MicroVention Inc. Research reported in this publication was supported by the Office of the Vice President of Research, College of Science and Engineering and the Departments of Radiology, Neurology and Neurosurgery, Biomedical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota.

Funding Information:
This work was funded by a grant from MicroVention, Inc. Research reported in this publication was supported by the Office of the Vice President of Research, College of Science and Engineering, and the Departments of Radiology, Neurology and Neurosurgery, Biomedical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 American Chemical Society.

Keywords

  • arteriovenous malformations
  • injectable liquid embolic
  • iron oxide nanoparticles
  • thermal implant
  • tumor ablation

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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