Initial storage of unfamiliar objects: Examining memory stores with signal detection analyses

Chad J. Marsolek, E. Darcy Burgund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The memory source(s) underlying performance of the object decision task were examined. Application of signal detection theory with independent indices of sensitivity and bias indicated that greater object decision sensitivity (possible vs. impossible object discrimination) is observed for primed than for unprimed objects and a greater bias to respond "possible" is observed for primed than for unprimed objects. To test whether a single memory store underlies the two effects, we assessed whether the two effects would be influenced in similar ways by a particular experimental manipulation. Sensitivity did not differ between processing of 180°-rotated primed objects vs. un-rotated primed objects, but bias to respond "possible" differed between those conditions in predictable ways depending on the cerebral hemisphere of direct test presentations. Results support a conciliatory resolution to the debate concerning memory in this task and help to clarify properties of memory stores underlying the initial storage of unfamiliar objects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-106
Number of pages26
JournalActa Psychologica
Volume119
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005

Keywords

  • Hemispheres
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Object perception
  • Priming

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