Inhibition of return in the visual field

The eccentricity effect is independent of cortical magnification

Yan Bao, Quan Lei, Yuan Fang, Yu Tong, Kerstin Schill, Ernst Pöppel, Hans Strasburger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inhibition of return (IOR) as an indicator of attentional control is characterized by an eccentricity effect, that is, the more peripheral visual field shows a stronger IOR magnitude relative to the perifoveal visual field. However, it could be argued that this eccentricity effect may not be an attention effect, but due to cortical magnification. To test this possibility, we examined this eccentricity effect in two conditions: the same-size condition in which identical stimuli were used at different eccentricities, and the size-scaling condition in which stimuli were scaled according to the cortical magnification factor (M-scaling), thus stimuli being larger at the more peripheral locations. The results showed that the magnitude of IOR was significantly stronger in the peripheral relative to the perifoveal visual field, and this eccentricity effect was independent of the manipulation of stimulus size (same-size or size-scaling). These results suggest a robust eccentricity effect of IOR which cannot be eliminated by M-scaling. Underlying neural mechanisms of the eccentricity effect of IOR are discussed with respect to both cortical and subcortical structures mediating attentional control in the perifoveal and peripheral visual field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)425-431
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental Psychology
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 4 2013

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Visual Fields
Inhibition (Psychology)
Visual Field
Inhibition of Return
Eccentricity
Stimulus
Scaling

Keywords

  • Cortical magnification
  • Eccentricity effect
  • Inhibition of return
  • Visual attention
  • Visual field

Cite this

Inhibition of return in the visual field : The eccentricity effect is independent of cortical magnification. / Bao, Yan; Lei, Quan; Fang, Yuan; Tong, Yu; Schill, Kerstin; Pöppel, Ernst; Strasburger, Hans.

In: Experimental Psychology, Vol. 60, No. 6, 04.12.2013, p. 425-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bao, Y, Lei, Q, Fang, Y, Tong, Y, Schill, K, Pöppel, E & Strasburger, H 2013, 'Inhibition of return in the visual field: The eccentricity effect is independent of cortical magnification', Experimental Psychology, vol. 60, no. 6, pp. 425-431. https://doi.org/10.1027/1618-3169/a000215
Bao, Yan ; Lei, Quan ; Fang, Yuan ; Tong, Yu ; Schill, Kerstin ; Pöppel, Ernst ; Strasburger, Hans. / Inhibition of return in the visual field : The eccentricity effect is independent of cortical magnification. In: Experimental Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 60, No. 6. pp. 425-431.
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