Ingested soluble CD14 from milk is transferred intact into the blood of newborn rats

Tonya L. Ward, William J. Spencer, Laura D.R. Davis, Joann Harrold, David R. MacK, Illimar Altosaar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background:Milk acts as an edible immune system that is transferred from mother to newborn. Soluble Cluster of Differentiation 14 (sCD14) is a protein found in significant quantities in human milk (∼8-29 g/ml). At a 10-fold lower concentration in the blood (∼3 g/ml), the most notable role of sCD14 is to sequester lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria from immune cells.Methods:To explore the pharmacodynamics of this milk protein and its biological fate, the biodistribution of radiolabeled sCD14 (14 C, 125 I) was monitored in 10-d-old rat pups.Results:Up to 3.4 ± 2.2% of the radiolabeled sCD14 administered was observed, intact, in the pup blood for up to 8 h post-ingestion. Additionally, 30.3 ± 13.0% of the radiolabeled sCD14 administered was observed degraded in the stomach at 8 h post-ingestion. A reservoir of intact, administered sCD14 (3.2 ± 0.3%), however, remained in the stomach at 8 h post-ingestion. Intact sCD14 was observed in the small intestine at 5.5 ± 1.6% of the dose fed at 8 h post-ingestion.Conclusion: The presence of intact sCD14 in the blood and the gastrointestinal tract of newborns post-ingestion has implications in the development of allergies, obesity, and other inflammation-related pathogeneses later in life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-258
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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