Influence of milk protein concentrates with modified calcium content on enteral dairy beverage formulations: Storage stability

K. Pandalaneni, K. Bhanduriya, J. K. Amamcharla, C. Marella, Lloyd Metzger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Control of calcium-mediated storage defects, such as age gelation and sedimentation, were evaluated in enteral high-protein dairy beverages during storage. To investigate the effects of reduced-calcium ingredients on storage stability, 2 batches each of milk protein concentrates (MPC) with 3 levels of calcium content were acquired [control, 20% calcium-reduced (MPC-20), and 30% calcium-reduced (MPC-30)]. Control and calcium-reduced MPC were used to formulate 8% (wt/wt) protein enteral dairy beverages. The formulation also consisted of other ingredients, such as gums, maltodextrin, potassium citrate, and sucrose. The pH-adjusted formulation was divided into 2 parts, one with 0.15% sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) and the other with 0% SHMP. The formulations were homogenized and retort sterilized at 121°C for 15 min. The retort-sterilized beverages were stored at room temperature for up to 90 d and particle size and apparent viscosity were measured on d 0, 7, 30, 60, and 90. Beverages formulated using control MPC with 0 and 0.15% SHMP exhibited sedimentation, causing a decrease in apparent viscosity by approximately 10 cP and clear phase separation by d 90. The MPC-20 beverages with 0% SHMP exhibited stable particle size and apparent viscosities during storage. In the presence of 0.15% SHMP, particle size increased rapidly by 40 nm on d 90, implying the start of progressive gelation. On the other hand, highest apparent viscosities leading to gelation were observed in MPC-30 beverages at both concentrations of SHMP studied. These results suggested that beverages formulated with MPC-20 and 0% SHMP would have better storage stability by maintaining lower apparent viscosities. Further reduction of calcium using MPC-30 resulted in rapid gelation of beverages during storage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-163
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume102
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Milk Proteins
Beverages
beverages
Small Intestine
dairies
Calcium
calcium
sodium
Viscosity
gelation
viscosity
Particle Size
particle size
ingredients
Potassium Citrate
milk protein concentrate
maltodextrins
Gingiva
sodium polymetaphosphate
dairy protein

Keywords

  • calcium-reduced MPC
  • high-protein dairy beverages
  • sodium hexametaphosphate

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Influence of milk protein concentrates with modified calcium content on enteral dairy beverage formulations : Storage stability. / Pandalaneni, K.; Bhanduriya, K.; Amamcharla, J. K.; Marella, C.; Metzger, Lloyd.

In: Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 102, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 155-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pandalaneni, K. ; Bhanduriya, K. ; Amamcharla, J. K. ; Marella, C. ; Metzger, Lloyd. / Influence of milk protein concentrates with modified calcium content on enteral dairy beverage formulations : Storage stability. In: Journal of Dairy Science. 2019 ; Vol. 102, No. 1. pp. 155-163.
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abstract = "Control of calcium-mediated storage defects, such as age gelation and sedimentation, were evaluated in enteral high-protein dairy beverages during storage. To investigate the effects of reduced-calcium ingredients on storage stability, 2 batches each of milk protein concentrates (MPC) with 3 levels of calcium content were acquired [control, 20{\%} calcium-reduced (MPC-20), and 30{\%} calcium-reduced (MPC-30)]. Control and calcium-reduced MPC were used to formulate 8{\%} (wt/wt) protein enteral dairy beverages. The formulation also consisted of other ingredients, such as gums, maltodextrin, potassium citrate, and sucrose. The pH-adjusted formulation was divided into 2 parts, one with 0.15{\%} sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) and the other with 0{\%} SHMP. The formulations were homogenized and retort sterilized at 121°C for 15 min. The retort-sterilized beverages were stored at room temperature for up to 90 d and particle size and apparent viscosity were measured on d 0, 7, 30, 60, and 90. Beverages formulated using control MPC with 0 and 0.15{\%} SHMP exhibited sedimentation, causing a decrease in apparent viscosity by approximately 10 cP and clear phase separation by d 90. The MPC-20 beverages with 0{\%} SHMP exhibited stable particle size and apparent viscosities during storage. In the presence of 0.15{\%} SHMP, particle size increased rapidly by 40 nm on d 90, implying the start of progressive gelation. On the other hand, highest apparent viscosities leading to gelation were observed in MPC-30 beverages at both concentrations of SHMP studied. These results suggested that beverages formulated with MPC-20 and 0{\%} SHMP would have better storage stability by maintaining lower apparent viscosities. Further reduction of calcium using MPC-30 resulted in rapid gelation of beverages during storage.",
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