Influence of dietary protein and carbohydrate sources on nitrogen metabolism and carbohydrate fermentation by ruminal microbes in continuous culture.

H. S. Hussein, Marshall D Stern, R. M. Jordan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Four diets containing 15% CP were formulated to study the effects of dietary carbohydrate and protein sources on N metabolism and carbohydrate fermentation by ruminal bacteria. Diets were supplied to eight dual-flow continuous culture fermenters during three experimental periods in a randomized complete block design. Six replications were obtained for each diet. Treatments were arranged as a 2 X 2 factorial with two carbohydrate and two protein sources. Carbohydrate sources were corn and barley and protein sources were soybean meal (SBM) and fish meal (FM). Approximately 40% of the dietary CP was derived from SBM or FM and corn or barley provided 39% of dietary DM. All diets contained 15% grass hay, 20% wheat straw, and 10.1 to 15.3% solka floc (DM basis). Interactions (P less than .05) were observed between dietary carbohydrate and protein sources, resulting in a depression of VFA production (moles/day) and digestion (percentage) of ADF and cellulose when the corn-FM diet was fed. True OM digestion (percentage) was higher (P less than .05) for SBM than for FM diets and for corn than for barley diets. Although dietary CP degradation (percentage) was higher (P less than .05) for SBM than for FM diets, non-NH3 N in the effluent (grams/day) was not different among diets due to a greater (P less than .05) bacterial N flow for SBM than for FM diets. Despite the lower amino acid (AA) intake (P less than .05) for corn than for barley diets and also for FM than for SBM diets, flows (grams/day) of total AA, essential AA (EAA), and nonessential AA (NEAA) were similar (P greater than .05) among diets. However, greater (P less than .05) total AA, EAA, and NEAA flows (percentage of AA intake) were found for corn than for barley diets and for FM than for SBM diets. It is concluded, therefore, that ruminal escape protein derived from corn or FM has a significant effect on manipulating AA leaving the ruminal fermentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2123-2133
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume69
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1991

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Influence of dietary protein and carbohydrate sources on nitrogen metabolism and carbohydrate fermentation by ruminal microbes in continuous culture.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this