Inflammation, insulin, and endothelial function in overweight children and adolescents: The role of exercise

Aaron S Kelly, Rachel J. Wetzsteon, Daniel R. Kaiser, Julia Steinberger, Alan J. Bank, Donald R Dengel

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Abstract

To assess subclinical inflammation, fasting insulin, and endothelial function before and after exercise in overweight children and adolescents. Twenty-five children (body mass index [BMI] >85th percentile) were assessed for brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), nitroglycerin-induced dilation, C-reactive protein (CRP), lipids, glucose, insulin, oral glucose tolerance, body composition, aerobic fitness (peak oxygen uptake [VO 2peak]), and blood pressure. Twenty of these persons were equally and randomly assigned to either 8 weeks of stationary cycling or to a non-exercising control group. A baseline correlation was found between CRP and fasting insulin (r = 0.62; P <. 001), which remained significant after adjusting for baseline variables (r = 0.53; P <. 05). After 8 weeks, significant improvements were observed in the exercise group compared with the control group for VO 2peak (exercise group = 21.8 ± 2.1 to 23.2 ± 1.5 mL/kg/minute vs control group = 23.4 ± 1.6 to 20.9 ± 2.2 mL/kg/minute; P <. 05), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (exercise group = 1.02 ± 0.03 to 1.10 ± 0.04 mmol/L vs control group = 1.08 ± 0.07 to 0.99 ± 0.09 mmol/L; P <. 05), and FMD area under the curve (AUC) (exercise group = 746 ± 66 to 919 ± 94 %•sec vs control group = 731 ± 102 to 515 ± 73 %•sec; P <. 05). In overweight children and adolescents, CRP is independently associated with fasting insulin. Eight weeks of aerobic exercise improves fitness, HDL cholesterol, and endothelial function in this group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)731-736
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume145
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

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Exercise
Insulin
Inflammation
Control Groups
C-Reactive Protein
Dilatation
Fasting
HDL Cholesterol
Brachial Artery
Nitroglycerin
Glucose Tolerance Test
Body Composition
Area Under Curve
Body Mass Index
Oxygen
Blood Pressure
Lipids
Glucose

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Inflammation, insulin, and endothelial function in overweight children and adolescents : The role of exercise. / Kelly, Aaron S; Wetzsteon, Rachel J.; Kaiser, Daniel R.; Steinberger, Julia; Bank, Alan J.; Dengel, Donald R.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 145, No. 6, 01.12.2004, p. 731-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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