Infidelity, trust, and condom use among latino youth in dating relationships

Sonya S. Brady, Jeanne M. Tschann, Jonathan M. Ellen, Elena Flores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Latino youth in the United States are at greater risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in comparison with non-Hispanic white youth. METHODS: Sexually active heterosexual Latino youth aged 16 to 22 years (N = 647) were recruited for interviews through a large health maintenance organization or community clinics. RESULTS: Adjusting for gender, age, ethnic heritage, and recruitment method, woman's consistent use of hormonal contraceptives, ambivalence about avoiding pregnancy, longer length of sexual relationship, and greater overall trust in main partner were independently associated with inconsistent condom use and engagement in a greater number of sexual intercourse acts that were unprotected by condom use. Perception that one's main partner had potentially been unfaithful, but not one's own sexual concurrency, was associated with consistent condom use and fewer acts of unprotected sexual intercourse. Sexually concurrent youth who engaged in inconsistent condom use with other partners were more likely to engage in inconsistent condom use and a greater number of unprotected sexual intercourse acts with main partners. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing attachment between youth may be a risk factor for the transmission of STIs via normative declines in condom use. Perception that one's partner has potentially been unfaithful may result in greater condom use. However, many Latino adolescents and young adults who engage in sexual concurrency may not take adequate steps to protect their partners from contracting STIs. Some youth may be more focused on the emotional and social repercussions of potentially revealing infidelity by advocating condom use than the physical repercussions of unsafe sex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-231
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009

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Condoms
Hispanic Americans
Coitus
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Unsafe Sex
Health Maintenance Organizations
Heterosexuality
Contraceptive Agents
Young Adult
Interviews
Pregnancy

Cite this

Infidelity, trust, and condom use among latino youth in dating relationships. / Brady, Sonya S.; Tschann, Jeanne M.; Ellen, Jonathan M.; Flores, Elena.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 36, No. 4, 01.04.2009, p. 227-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brady, Sonya S. ; Tschann, Jeanne M. ; Ellen, Jonathan M. ; Flores, Elena. / Infidelity, trust, and condom use among latino youth in dating relationships. In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 2009 ; Vol. 36, No. 4. pp. 227-231.
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