Infants' sensitivity to accretion and deletion of texture as information for depth at an edge.

C. E. Granrud, A. Yonas, I. M. Smith, M. E. Arterberry, M. L. Glicksman, A. C. Sorknes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Based on Gibson's hypothesis that accretion and deletion of texture in the optic array provides unambiguous information for the spatial layout of surfaces, we sought evidence of early responsiveness to this information with infant subjects. 5- and 7-month-olds viewed computer-generated random-dot displays in which accretion and deletion of texture provided the only information for contours, specifying either a foreground surface moving in front of and occluding a moving background surface or 2 partially overlapping surfaces. The infants in both age groups showed significant preferences to reach for the apparently nearer regions in the displays. Since previous research has shown that infants reach more frequently for the nearer of 2 surfaces, these results indicate that 5- and 7-month-olds are sensitive to accretion and deletion of texture as information for the spatial layout of surfaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1630-1636
Number of pages7
JournalChild development
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1984

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