Infants' ability to respond to depth from the retinal size of human faces: Comparing monocular and binocular preferential-looking

Aki Tsuruhara, Sherryse Corrow, So Kanazawa, Masami K. Yamaguchi, Albert Yonas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To examine sensitivity to pictorial depth cues in young infants (4 and 5 months-of-age), we compared monocular and binocular preferential looking to a display on which two faces were equidistantly presented and one was larger than the other, depicting depth from the size of human faces. Because human faces vary little in size, the correlation between retinal size and distance can provide depth information. As a result, adults perceive a larger face as closer than a smaller one. Although binocular information for depth provided information that the faces in our display were equidistant, under monocular viewing, no such information was provided. Rather, the size of the faces indicated that one was closer than the other. Infants are known to look longer at apparently closer objects. Therefore, we hypothesized that infants would look longer at a larger face in the monocular than in the binocular condition if they perceived depth from the size of human faces. Because the displays were identical in the two conditions, any difference in looking-behavior between monocular and binocular viewing indicated sensitivity to depth information. Results showed that 5-month-old infants preferred the larger, apparently closer, face in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition when static displays were presented. In addition, when presented with a dynamic display, 4-month-old infants showed a stronger 'closer' preference in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition. This was not the case when the faces were inverted. These results suggest that even 4-month-old infants respond to depth information from a depth cue that may require learning, the size of faces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)562-570
Number of pages9
JournalInfant Behavior and Development
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Aptitude
Cues
Learning

Keywords

  • Depth
  • Face
  • Familiar size
  • Infant
  • Preferential looking
  • Relative size

Cite this

Infants' ability to respond to depth from the retinal size of human faces : Comparing monocular and binocular preferential-looking. / Tsuruhara, Aki; Corrow, Sherryse; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Yonas, Albert.

In: Infant Behavior and Development, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 562-570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsuruhara, Aki ; Corrow, Sherryse ; Kanazawa, So ; Yamaguchi, Masami K. ; Yonas, Albert. / Infants' ability to respond to depth from the retinal size of human faces : Comparing monocular and binocular preferential-looking. In: Infant Behavior and Development. 2014 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 562-570.
@article{d5d1d1e71c144d479b3ce2ee181e7e6c,
title = "Infants' ability to respond to depth from the retinal size of human faces: Comparing monocular and binocular preferential-looking",
abstract = "To examine sensitivity to pictorial depth cues in young infants (4 and 5 months-of-age), we compared monocular and binocular preferential looking to a display on which two faces were equidistantly presented and one was larger than the other, depicting depth from the size of human faces. Because human faces vary little in size, the correlation between retinal size and distance can provide depth information. As a result, adults perceive a larger face as closer than a smaller one. Although binocular information for depth provided information that the faces in our display were equidistant, under monocular viewing, no such information was provided. Rather, the size of the faces indicated that one was closer than the other. Infants are known to look longer at apparently closer objects. Therefore, we hypothesized that infants would look longer at a larger face in the monocular than in the binocular condition if they perceived depth from the size of human faces. Because the displays were identical in the two conditions, any difference in looking-behavior between monocular and binocular viewing indicated sensitivity to depth information. Results showed that 5-month-old infants preferred the larger, apparently closer, face in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition when static displays were presented. In addition, when presented with a dynamic display, 4-month-old infants showed a stronger 'closer' preference in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition. This was not the case when the faces were inverted. These results suggest that even 4-month-old infants respond to depth information from a depth cue that may require learning, the size of faces.",
keywords = "Depth, Face, Familiar size, Infant, Preferential looking, Relative size",
author = "Aki Tsuruhara and Sherryse Corrow and So Kanazawa and Yamaguchi, {Masami K.} and Albert Yonas",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.infbeh.2014.07.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "562--570",
journal = "Infant Behavior and Development",
issn = "0163-6383",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infants' ability to respond to depth from the retinal size of human faces

T2 - Comparing monocular and binocular preferential-looking

AU - Tsuruhara, Aki

AU - Corrow, Sherryse

AU - Kanazawa, So

AU - Yamaguchi, Masami K.

AU - Yonas, Albert

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - To examine sensitivity to pictorial depth cues in young infants (4 and 5 months-of-age), we compared monocular and binocular preferential looking to a display on which two faces were equidistantly presented and one was larger than the other, depicting depth from the size of human faces. Because human faces vary little in size, the correlation between retinal size and distance can provide depth information. As a result, adults perceive a larger face as closer than a smaller one. Although binocular information for depth provided information that the faces in our display were equidistant, under monocular viewing, no such information was provided. Rather, the size of the faces indicated that one was closer than the other. Infants are known to look longer at apparently closer objects. Therefore, we hypothesized that infants would look longer at a larger face in the monocular than in the binocular condition if they perceived depth from the size of human faces. Because the displays were identical in the two conditions, any difference in looking-behavior between monocular and binocular viewing indicated sensitivity to depth information. Results showed that 5-month-old infants preferred the larger, apparently closer, face in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition when static displays were presented. In addition, when presented with a dynamic display, 4-month-old infants showed a stronger 'closer' preference in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition. This was not the case when the faces were inverted. These results suggest that even 4-month-old infants respond to depth information from a depth cue that may require learning, the size of faces.

AB - To examine sensitivity to pictorial depth cues in young infants (4 and 5 months-of-age), we compared monocular and binocular preferential looking to a display on which two faces were equidistantly presented and one was larger than the other, depicting depth from the size of human faces. Because human faces vary little in size, the correlation between retinal size and distance can provide depth information. As a result, adults perceive a larger face as closer than a smaller one. Although binocular information for depth provided information that the faces in our display were equidistant, under monocular viewing, no such information was provided. Rather, the size of the faces indicated that one was closer than the other. Infants are known to look longer at apparently closer objects. Therefore, we hypothesized that infants would look longer at a larger face in the monocular than in the binocular condition if they perceived depth from the size of human faces. Because the displays were identical in the two conditions, any difference in looking-behavior between monocular and binocular viewing indicated sensitivity to depth information. Results showed that 5-month-old infants preferred the larger, apparently closer, face in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition when static displays were presented. In addition, when presented with a dynamic display, 4-month-old infants showed a stronger 'closer' preference in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition. This was not the case when the faces were inverted. These results suggest that even 4-month-old infants respond to depth information from a depth cue that may require learning, the size of faces.

KW - Depth

KW - Face

KW - Familiar size

KW - Infant

KW - Preferential looking

KW - Relative size

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905715351&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905715351&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.infbeh.2014.07.002

DO - 10.1016/j.infbeh.2014.07.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 25113916

AN - SCOPUS:84905715351

VL - 37

SP - 562

EP - 570

JO - Infant Behavior and Development

JF - Infant Behavior and Development

SN - 0163-6383

IS - 4

ER -