Induction of pregnancy during established EAE halts progression of CNS autoimmune injury via pregnancy-specific serum factors

Na Tosha N. Gatson, Jessica L. Williams, Nicole D. Powell, Melanie A. McClain, Teresa R. Hennon, Paul D. Robbins, Caroline C. Whitacre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the CNS involving T cell targeting of myelin antigens. During pregnancy, women with MS experience decreased relapses followed by a post partum disease flare. Using murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we recapitulate pregnancy findings in both relapsing and progressive models. Pregnant mice produced less TNF-α, IL-17 and exhibited reduced CNS pathology relative to non-pregnant controls. Microparticles, called exosomes, shed into the blood during pregnancy were isolated and found to significantly suppress T cell activation relative to those from non-pregnant controls. These results demonstrate the immunosuppressive potential of pregnancy and serum-derived pregnancy exosomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-113
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume230
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • Exosomes
  • Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Pregnancy

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