Increasing rates of hospitalization due to septicemia in the US elderly population, 1986-1997

Alexander M McBean, Sripriya Rajamani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rates of hospitalization due to septicemia (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, code 038) in the US elderly population for 1986-1997 were examined, using Medicare administrative data. Age group-, sex-, and race-adjusted rates more than doubled from 1986 through 1997, from 3.42 to 7.42 per 1000 beneficiaries. The 1997 rates of septicemia increased with age, from 4.47 per 1000 beneficiaries among persons 65-74 years old to 18.1 per 1000 beneficiaries among persons ≥85 years old. The rates of septicemia were slightly greater among men (7.46 per 1000 beneficiaries) than among women (7.39 per 1000 beneficiaries) and were higher among blacks (13.61 per 1000 beneficiaries) than among whites (6.89 per 1000 beneficiaries). The most likely sites of the origin of the septicemia were the urinary tract (40.1%) and lungs (15.3%). Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus species were the most frequently reported organisms. Diabetes was listed as a comorbidity in 24.5% of the hospitalizations. We estimate that the cost to Medicare for septicemia hospitalizations in 1997 was >$1.8 billion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)596-603
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume183
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2001

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Financial support: Association of Schools of Public Health/Centers for Disease Control/Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry Cooperative Agreement Program; project identification: Trends in Infectious Disease Morbidity in the United States (S376-16/16).

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Increasing rates of hospitalization due to septicemia in the US elderly population, 1986-1997'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this