Incidental asymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhages and risk of subsequent cardiovascular events and cognitive decline in elderly persons

Adnan I Qureshi, Morad Chughtai, Ahmed A. Malik, Cara Bezzina, Muhammad Fareed Suri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background The long-term prognostic significance of incidental asymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhages (aICHs) detected on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is unknown. Methods We analyzed clinical and baseline MRI data from the cohort of 5888 study participants aged 65 years and older recruited in the Cardiovascular Health Study from 4 US communities. We identified participants who had aICHs on MRI and selected 3 age- and gender-matched controls without aICHs. We compared the rates of cardiovascular events using logistic regression analysis including incident myocardial infarction, stroke, and death between those with and without aICHs. Results A total of 23 participants had aICHs classified as acute (n = 3), subacute (n = 4), and chronic (n = 16). During 14 years of follow-up, the risk of incident stroke (relative risk [RR],.6; 95% confidence interval [CI],.2-2.0), myocardial infarction (RR,.3; 95% CI,.06-1.4), and death (RR,.6; 95% CI,.2-1.7) was not different between participants with aICHs compared with controls (n = 69). There was no difference between the 2 groups with regard to time to ischemic stroke or time to death by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Conclusions The risks of stroke, myocardial infarction, and death were similar between persons with aICHs detected on MRI compared with age- and gender-matched controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1217-1222
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • Intracerebral hemorrhage
  • asymptomatic
  • cardiovascular events
  • epidemiologic study
  • stroke

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