Incident hospitalization with major cardiovascular diseases and subsequent risk of ESKD: Implications for cardiorenal syndrome

Junichi Ishigami, Logan T. Cowan, Ryan T. Demmer, Morgan E. Grams, Pamela L. Lutsey, Juan Jesus Carrero, Josef Coresh, Kunihiro Matsushita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Cardiorenal syndrome is a well known concept, bolstered by extensive investigations of CKD as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease. However, data on whether cardiovascular disease increases long-term risk of ESKD are sparse. Methods We assessed the association of incident hospitalization with major cardiovascular diseases (heart failure, atrial fibrillation, coronary heart disease, and stroke) with subsequent risk of ESKD among individuals enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study; the analysis included 9047 individuals without prevalent cardiovascular disease at their fourth study visit. Each relevant incident cardiovascular disease event was entered into multivariable Cox proportional hazard models as a timevarying exposure to estimate hazard ratios. Results During a median follow-up of 17.5 years, there were 2598 cases of hospitalization with cardiovascular disease (heart failure, n=1269; atrial fibrillation, n=1337; coronary heart disease, n=696; and stroke, n=559) and 210 cases of incident ESKD. The incidence ofmajor cardiovascular disease was associated with increased risk of ESKD, with the highest risk for heart failure (hazard ratio, 11.40; 95% confidence interval, 8.38 to 15.50), followed by coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation, and stroke. When we analyzed heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction separately, the risk was nominally higher for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Conclusions Major incident cardiovascular disease events were associated with ESKD, independent of kidney risk factors. In particular, heart failure showed a very strong association with ESKD. Our findings highlight the importance of monitoring and managing kidney disease in patients with cardiovascular disease. The potentially distinct contribution to ESKD of heart failure with preserved versus reduced ejection fraction deserves future investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-414
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services (contracts HHSN268201700001I, HHSN268201700002I, HHSN268201700003I, HHSN268201700005I, and HHSN268201700004I).

Funding Information:
Dr. Carrero reports support from the Swedish Research Council (2019-01059), grants from Astellas, AstraZeneca, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Swedish Research Council, and ViforPharma, outside the submitted work. Dr. Coresh reports grants from National Institutes of Health, grants from National Kidney Foundation, during the conduct of the study. Dr. Grams reports nonfinancial support from Dialysis Clinics Incorporated, nonfinancial support from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes, grants from National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, grants from National Kidney Foundation, outside the submitted work. Dr. Lutsey reports grants from National Institutes of Health, during the conduct of the study. Dr. Matsushita reports personal fees from Akebia, grants and personal fees from Kyowa Kirin, outside the submitted work.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the American Society of Nephrology.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Observational Study
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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