Incidence and prognostic value of low plasma ionized calcium concentration in cats with acute pancreatitis: 46 cases (1996-1998)

Susan E. Kimmel, Robert J. Washabau, Kenneth J. Drobatz

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Abstract

Objective - To determine the incidence and prognostic significance of low plasma ionized calcium concentration in cats with clinical signs of acute pancreatitis (AP). Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 46 cats with AP and 92 control cats with nonpancreatic diseases. Procedure - Medical records were reviewed, and results of clinicopathologic testing, including plasma ionized and total calcium concentrations, acid-base values, and electrolyte concentrations, were recorded. Cats with AP were grouped on the basis of outcome (survived vs died or were euthanatized), and plasma ionized calcium concentrations, acid-base values, and electrolyte concentrations were compared between groups. Results - Serum total calcium concentration was low in 19 (41%) cats with AP, and plasma ionized calcium concentration was low in 28 (61%). Cats with AP had a significantly lower median plasma ionized calcium concentration (1.07 mmol/L) than did control cats (1.12 mmol/L). Nineteen (41%) cats with AP died or were euthanatized; these cats had a significantly lower median plasma ionized calcium concentration (1.00 mmol/L) than did cats that survived (1.12 mmol/L). Ten of the 13 cats with AP that had plasma ionized calcium concentrations ≤ 1.00 mmol/L died or were euthanatized. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that low plasma ionized calcium concentration is common in cats with AP and is associated with a poorer outcome. A grave prognosis and aggressive medical treatment are warranted for cats with AP that have a plasma ionized calcium concentration ≤ 1.00 mmol/L. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1105-1109).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1105-1109
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume219
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2001

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pancreatitis
Pancreatitis
Cats
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Calcium
calcium
incidence
Incidence
Electrolytes
electrolytes
Acids
medical treatment
acids
retrospective studies
prognosis
Medical Records
Retrospective Studies

Cite this

Incidence and prognostic value of low plasma ionized calcium concentration in cats with acute pancreatitis : 46 cases (1996-1998). / Kimmel, Susan E.; Washabau, Robert J.; Drobatz, Kenneth J.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 219, No. 8, 15.10.2001, p. 1105-1109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective - To determine the incidence and prognostic significance of low plasma ionized calcium concentration in cats with clinical signs of acute pancreatitis (AP). Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 46 cats with AP and 92 control cats with nonpancreatic diseases. Procedure - Medical records were reviewed, and results of clinicopathologic testing, including plasma ionized and total calcium concentrations, acid-base values, and electrolyte concentrations, were recorded. Cats with AP were grouped on the basis of outcome (survived vs died or were euthanatized), and plasma ionized calcium concentrations, acid-base values, and electrolyte concentrations were compared between groups. Results - Serum total calcium concentration was low in 19 (41{\%}) cats with AP, and plasma ionized calcium concentration was low in 28 (61{\%}). Cats with AP had a significantly lower median plasma ionized calcium concentration (1.07 mmol/L) than did control cats (1.12 mmol/L). Nineteen (41{\%}) cats with AP died or were euthanatized; these cats had a significantly lower median plasma ionized calcium concentration (1.00 mmol/L) than did cats that survived (1.12 mmol/L). Ten of the 13 cats with AP that had plasma ionized calcium concentrations ≤ 1.00 mmol/L died or were euthanatized. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that low plasma ionized calcium concentration is common in cats with AP and is associated with a poorer outcome. A grave prognosis and aggressive medical treatment are warranted for cats with AP that have a plasma ionized calcium concentration ≤ 1.00 mmol/L. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1105-1109).",
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AB - Objective - To determine the incidence and prognostic significance of low plasma ionized calcium concentration in cats with clinical signs of acute pancreatitis (AP). Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 46 cats with AP and 92 control cats with nonpancreatic diseases. Procedure - Medical records were reviewed, and results of clinicopathologic testing, including plasma ionized and total calcium concentrations, acid-base values, and electrolyte concentrations, were recorded. Cats with AP were grouped on the basis of outcome (survived vs died or were euthanatized), and plasma ionized calcium concentrations, acid-base values, and electrolyte concentrations were compared between groups. Results - Serum total calcium concentration was low in 19 (41%) cats with AP, and plasma ionized calcium concentration was low in 28 (61%). Cats with AP had a significantly lower median plasma ionized calcium concentration (1.07 mmol/L) than did control cats (1.12 mmol/L). Nineteen (41%) cats with AP died or were euthanatized; these cats had a significantly lower median plasma ionized calcium concentration (1.00 mmol/L) than did cats that survived (1.12 mmol/L). Ten of the 13 cats with AP that had plasma ionized calcium concentrations ≤ 1.00 mmol/L died or were euthanatized. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that low plasma ionized calcium concentration is common in cats with AP and is associated with a poorer outcome. A grave prognosis and aggressive medical treatment are warranted for cats with AP that have a plasma ionized calcium concentration ≤ 1.00 mmol/L. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1105-1109).

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