In Vivo 31P and 1H NMR studies of rat brain tumor pH and blood flow during acute hyperglycemia: Differential effects between subcutaneous and intracerebral locations

Brian D. Ross, Steven L. Mitchell, Hellmut Merkle, Michael Garwood

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27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Surface coil NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor the hyperglycemia‐induced alterations in pH and blood flow in vivo in C6 gliomas implanted both subcutaneously and intracerebrally in rats. Tumor pH was calculated from the chemical shift difference between PCr and Pi in the 31P NMR spectra. Subcutaneous glioma pH decreased 0.8 units by 1 h after intraperitoneal administration of an aqueous 50% glucose solution (6 g glucose per kg body weight). In contrast, hyperglycemia failed to significantly alter the pH of intracerebral gliomas which were monitored for 90 min following administration of glucose. Tumor blood flow (TBF) was determined both pre‐ and post‐glucose administration using deuterium NMR by monitoring the time course of D2O washout following intratumoral injection of saline D2O. Subcutaneous and intracerebral TBF were found to have an average change of‐78.1 % (range ‐47.4 to ‐93.3%, n = 5) and ‐21.1% (range +6.0 to ‐37.8%, n = 9), respectively. In addition, laser Doppler blood flow measurements of rat skin and subcutaneous glioma revealed a dramatic reduction in blood flow in both tissues following glucose administration. These results indicate that the effects of acute hyperglycemia are site dependent and that hyperglycemia alone is not beneficial for inducing intracellular acidosis in intracerebral tumors. © 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-234
Number of pages16
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1989

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