In vivo fluorescence imaging is well-suited for the monitoring of adenovirus directed transgene expression in living organisms

Sevim Kahraman, Ercument Dirice, Ahter Dilsad Sanlioglu, Burcak Yoldas, Huseyin Bagci, Metin Erkilic, Thomas S. Griffith, Salih Sanlioglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: We tested a new light detection cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) for in vivo assessment of noninvasive whole-body fluorescence optical imaging of adenovirus directed enhanced green fluorescent protein (AdEGFP) expression. Procedures: AdEGFP was injected i.v. into BALB/c mice via tail vein. Whole-body fluorescence optical imaging of AdEGFP expression was performed using a Kodak 2000MM Image Station before and after vector administration. Results: EGFP expression was exclusively detected around the abdominal cavity, and the fluorescent signal peaked at day 4 and then remained detectable for at least 30 days. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging confirmed that EGFP expression was restricted to the liver, and transgene expression was homogeneously diffused into all four lobes. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that in vivo fluorescence imaging provides functional data indicating the approximate location, magnitude, and duration of AdEGFP expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-285
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular Imaging and Biology
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments. This work was supported by the grants from the Akdeniz University Scientific Research Project Administration Division and Health Science Institute (2007.02.0122.016).

Keywords

  • Adenoviral vector
  • CCD camera
  • EGFP
  • Gene therapy
  • In vivo imaging

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