In vitro and in vivo studies of 17O NMR sensitivity at 9.4 and 16.4 T

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In vivo 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been successfully applied for imaging the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption through the detection of metabolically produced H2 17O from the inhaled 17O-labeled oxygen in animals at high field. In this study, we compared the 17O sensitivity for detecting natural abundance H217O signals from a phantom solution and rat brains at 9.4 and 16.4 T. The 17O signal-to-noise ratio measured at 16.4 T was 2.9- and 2.7-2.8-fold higher than that at 9.4 T for the phantom and rat brain studies, respectively. Similarly, three-dimensional 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging data showed a more than 2.7-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio in the central rat brain region at 16.4 T than that at 9.4 T. The substantial 17O signal-to-noise ratio gain at ultrahigh field significantly improved the reliability for imaging the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption and will provide an opportunity for in vivo assessment of altered oxidative metabolism associated with brain functions and neurological diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1523-1527
Number of pages5
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume69
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

Fingerprint

Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Brain
Oxygen Consumption
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Oxygen
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption
  • high field
  • in vivo O magnetic resonance spectroscopy
  • sensitivity
  • signal-to-noise ratio

Cite this

In vitro and in vivo studies of 17O NMR sensitivity at 9.4 and 16.4 T. / Lu, Ming; Zhang, Yi; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Xiao Hong.

In: Magnetic resonance in medicine, Vol. 69, No. 6, 01.06.2013, p. 1523-1527.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2bf59acd788643bc8127cad7794a6e01,
title = "In vitro and in vivo studies of 17O NMR sensitivity at 9.4 and 16.4 T",
abstract = "In vivo 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been successfully applied for imaging the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption through the detection of metabolically produced H2 17O from the inhaled 17O-labeled oxygen in animals at high field. In this study, we compared the 17O sensitivity for detecting natural abundance H217O signals from a phantom solution and rat brains at 9.4 and 16.4 T. The 17O signal-to-noise ratio measured at 16.4 T was 2.9- and 2.7-2.8-fold higher than that at 9.4 T for the phantom and rat brain studies, respectively. Similarly, three-dimensional 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging data showed a more than 2.7-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio in the central rat brain region at 16.4 T than that at 9.4 T. The substantial 17O signal-to-noise ratio gain at ultrahigh field significantly improved the reliability for imaging the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption and will provide an opportunity for in vivo assessment of altered oxidative metabolism associated with brain functions and neurological diseases.",
keywords = "cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption, high field, in vivo O magnetic resonance spectroscopy, sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio",
author = "Ming Lu and Yi Zhang and Kamil Ugurbil and Wei Chen and Zhu, {Xiao Hong}",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/mrm.24386",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "69",
pages = "1523--1527",
journal = "Magnetic Resonance in Medicine",
issn = "0740-3194",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In vitro and in vivo studies of 17O NMR sensitivity at 9.4 and 16.4 T

AU - Lu, Ming

AU - Zhang, Yi

AU - Ugurbil, Kamil

AU - Chen, Wei

AU - Zhu, Xiao Hong

PY - 2013/6/1

Y1 - 2013/6/1

N2 - In vivo 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been successfully applied for imaging the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption through the detection of metabolically produced H2 17O from the inhaled 17O-labeled oxygen in animals at high field. In this study, we compared the 17O sensitivity for detecting natural abundance H217O signals from a phantom solution and rat brains at 9.4 and 16.4 T. The 17O signal-to-noise ratio measured at 16.4 T was 2.9- and 2.7-2.8-fold higher than that at 9.4 T for the phantom and rat brain studies, respectively. Similarly, three-dimensional 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging data showed a more than 2.7-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio in the central rat brain region at 16.4 T than that at 9.4 T. The substantial 17O signal-to-noise ratio gain at ultrahigh field significantly improved the reliability for imaging the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption and will provide an opportunity for in vivo assessment of altered oxidative metabolism associated with brain functions and neurological diseases.

AB - In vivo 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been successfully applied for imaging the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption through the detection of metabolically produced H2 17O from the inhaled 17O-labeled oxygen in animals at high field. In this study, we compared the 17O sensitivity for detecting natural abundance H217O signals from a phantom solution and rat brains at 9.4 and 16.4 T. The 17O signal-to-noise ratio measured at 16.4 T was 2.9- and 2.7-2.8-fold higher than that at 9.4 T for the phantom and rat brain studies, respectively. Similarly, three-dimensional 17O magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging data showed a more than 2.7-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio in the central rat brain region at 16.4 T than that at 9.4 T. The substantial 17O signal-to-noise ratio gain at ultrahigh field significantly improved the reliability for imaging the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption and will provide an opportunity for in vivo assessment of altered oxidative metabolism associated with brain functions and neurological diseases.

KW - cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption

KW - high field

KW - in vivo O magnetic resonance spectroscopy

KW - sensitivity

KW - signal-to-noise ratio

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84878112069&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84878112069&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/mrm.24386

DO - 10.1002/mrm.24386

M3 - Article

C2 - 22777729

AN - SCOPUS:84878112069

VL - 69

SP - 1523

EP - 1527

JO - Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

JF - Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

SN - 0740-3194

IS - 6

ER -