In-Hospital vital status and heart transplants after intervention for congenital heart disease in the pediatric cardiac care consortium: Completeness of ascertainment using the national death index and united network for organ sharing datasets

Logan G. Spector, Jeremiah S. Menk, Jeffrey M. Vinocur, Matthew E. Oster, Brian A. Harvey, James D St Louis, James Moller, Lazaros K. Kochilas

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Abstract

Background-The long-term outcomes of patients undergoing interventions for congenital heart disease (CHD) remain largely unknown. We linked the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) with the National Death Index (NDI) and the United Network for Organ Sharing Dataset (UNOS) registries to study mortality and transplant occurring up to 32 years postintervention. The objective of the current analysis was to determine the sensitivity of this linkage in identifying patients who are known to have died or undergone heart transplant. Methods and Results-We used direct identifiers from 59 324 subjects registered in the PCCC between 1982 and 2003 to test for completeness of case ascertainment of subjects with known vital and heart transplant status by linkage with the NDI and UNOS registries. Of the 4612 in-hospital deaths, 3873 were identified by the NDI as "true" matches for a sensitivity of 84.0% (95% CI, 82.9-85.0). There was no difference in sensitivity across 25 congenital cardiovascular conditions after adjustment for age, sex, race, presence of first name, death year, and residence at death. Of 455 known heart transplants in the PCCC, there were 408 matches in the UNOS registry, for a sensitivity of 89.7% (95% CI, 86.9-92.3). An additional 4851 deaths and 363 transplants that occurred outside the PCCC were identified through 2014. Conclusions-The linkage of the PCCC with the NDI and UNOS national registries is feasible with a satisfactory sensitivity. This linkage provides a conservative estimate of the long-term death and heart transplant events in this cohort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere003783
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume5
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2016

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Heart Diseases
Pediatrics
Transplants
Registries
Datasets
Names
Mortality

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Mortality
  • Sensitivity and specificity
  • Transplant

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In-Hospital vital status and heart transplants after intervention for congenital heart disease in the pediatric cardiac care consortium : Completeness of ascertainment using the national death index and united network for organ sharing datasets. / Spector, Logan G.; Menk, Jeremiah S.; Vinocur, Jeffrey M.; Oster, Matthew E.; Harvey, Brian A.; Louis, James D St; Moller, James; Kochilas, Lazaros K.

In: Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol. 5, No. 8, e003783, 08.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background-The long-term outcomes of patients undergoing interventions for congenital heart disease (CHD) remain largely unknown. We linked the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) with the National Death Index (NDI) and the United Network for Organ Sharing Dataset (UNOS) registries to study mortality and transplant occurring up to 32 years postintervention. The objective of the current analysis was to determine the sensitivity of this linkage in identifying patients who are known to have died or undergone heart transplant. Methods and Results-We used direct identifiers from 59 324 subjects registered in the PCCC between 1982 and 2003 to test for completeness of case ascertainment of subjects with known vital and heart transplant status by linkage with the NDI and UNOS registries. Of the 4612 in-hospital deaths, 3873 were identified by the NDI as {"}true{"} matches for a sensitivity of 84.0{\%} (95{\%} CI, 82.9-85.0). There was no difference in sensitivity across 25 congenital cardiovascular conditions after adjustment for age, sex, race, presence of first name, death year, and residence at death. Of 455 known heart transplants in the PCCC, there were 408 matches in the UNOS registry, for a sensitivity of 89.7{\%} (95{\%} CI, 86.9-92.3). An additional 4851 deaths and 363 transplants that occurred outside the PCCC were identified through 2014. Conclusions-The linkage of the PCCC with the NDI and UNOS national registries is feasible with a satisfactory sensitivity. This linkage provides a conservative estimate of the long-term death and heart transplant events in this cohort.",
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AU - Menk, Jeremiah S.

AU - Vinocur, Jeffrey M.

AU - Oster, Matthew E.

AU - Harvey, Brian A.

AU - Louis, James D St

AU - Moller, James

AU - Kochilas, Lazaros K.

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N2 - Background-The long-term outcomes of patients undergoing interventions for congenital heart disease (CHD) remain largely unknown. We linked the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) with the National Death Index (NDI) and the United Network for Organ Sharing Dataset (UNOS) registries to study mortality and transplant occurring up to 32 years postintervention. The objective of the current analysis was to determine the sensitivity of this linkage in identifying patients who are known to have died or undergone heart transplant. Methods and Results-We used direct identifiers from 59 324 subjects registered in the PCCC between 1982 and 2003 to test for completeness of case ascertainment of subjects with known vital and heart transplant status by linkage with the NDI and UNOS registries. Of the 4612 in-hospital deaths, 3873 were identified by the NDI as "true" matches for a sensitivity of 84.0% (95% CI, 82.9-85.0). There was no difference in sensitivity across 25 congenital cardiovascular conditions after adjustment for age, sex, race, presence of first name, death year, and residence at death. Of 455 known heart transplants in the PCCC, there were 408 matches in the UNOS registry, for a sensitivity of 89.7% (95% CI, 86.9-92.3). An additional 4851 deaths and 363 transplants that occurred outside the PCCC were identified through 2014. Conclusions-The linkage of the PCCC with the NDI and UNOS national registries is feasible with a satisfactory sensitivity. This linkage provides a conservative estimate of the long-term death and heart transplant events in this cohort.

AB - Background-The long-term outcomes of patients undergoing interventions for congenital heart disease (CHD) remain largely unknown. We linked the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) with the National Death Index (NDI) and the United Network for Organ Sharing Dataset (UNOS) registries to study mortality and transplant occurring up to 32 years postintervention. The objective of the current analysis was to determine the sensitivity of this linkage in identifying patients who are known to have died or undergone heart transplant. Methods and Results-We used direct identifiers from 59 324 subjects registered in the PCCC between 1982 and 2003 to test for completeness of case ascertainment of subjects with known vital and heart transplant status by linkage with the NDI and UNOS registries. Of the 4612 in-hospital deaths, 3873 were identified by the NDI as "true" matches for a sensitivity of 84.0% (95% CI, 82.9-85.0). There was no difference in sensitivity across 25 congenital cardiovascular conditions after adjustment for age, sex, race, presence of first name, death year, and residence at death. Of 455 known heart transplants in the PCCC, there were 408 matches in the UNOS registry, for a sensitivity of 89.7% (95% CI, 86.9-92.3). An additional 4851 deaths and 363 transplants that occurred outside the PCCC were identified through 2014. Conclusions-The linkage of the PCCC with the NDI and UNOS national registries is feasible with a satisfactory sensitivity. This linkage provides a conservative estimate of the long-term death and heart transplant events in this cohort.

KW - Cohort study

KW - Congenital heart disease

KW - Mortality

KW - Sensitivity and specificity

KW - Transplant

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