Improving the thromboresistivity of chemical sensors via nitric oxide release: Fabrication and in vivo evaluation of NO-releasing oxygen-sensing catheters

Mark H. Schoenfisch, Kelly A. Mowery, Monica V. Rader, Narayan Baliga, Joyce A. Wahr, Mark E. Meyerhoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

108 Scopus citations

Abstract

The development and in vivo analytical performance of a nitric oxide (NO)-releasing amperometric oxygen sensor with greatly enhanced thromboresistivity are reported. Gas permeable coatings formulated with cross-linked silicone rubber (SR) containing NO-generating compounds (diazeniumdiolates) are shown to release NO for extended periods of time (>20 h) while reducing platelet adhesion and activation. Oxygen-sensing catheters prepared by dip-coating the NO-releasing films over the outer SR tubes of the implantable devices display similar analytical response properties in vitro (sensitivity, selectivity, response times) when compared to analogous sensors prepared without the NO release coatings. Superior analytical accuracy (relative to blood PO2 values measured in vitro) and greatly reduced thrombus formation on the outer surface of the sensors are observed in vivo (in canine model) with the NO release PO2 sensors compared to control sensors (without NO release) implanted simultaneously within the same animals. Based on these preliminary studies, the use of NO release polymers to fabricate catheter-style chemical sensors may be a potential solution to lingering biocompatibility and concomitant performance problems encountered when attempting to employ such devices for continuous intravascular measurements of blood gases and electrolytes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1119-1126
Number of pages8
JournalAnalytical chemistry
Volume72
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2000

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