Improved late graft survival and half-lives in pediatric kidney transplantation: A single center experience

Abhay Vats, Kristen Gillingham, Arthur Matas, Blanche Chavers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

We evaluated variables associated with improved late graft survival in 290 children transplanted between 11/ 1/1984 and 12/31/1997, and who had > 1 year graft survival. We studied the following variables: age, gender, race, primary disease (diseases prone to recurrence, i.e. hemolytic uremic syndrome, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis or oxalosis vs. others), primary vs. retransplant; donor source, acute tubular necrosis, acute rejection episodes in the first year, transplant era and discharge serum creatinine. Graft half-life was defined as the time taken for 1/2 of the grafts functioning at 1 year to fail. There were 205 living donor and 85 cadaveric transplant. The cumulative graft survival at 5 and 10-years was 88% and 75% for living donor, and 72% and 46% for cadaveric, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed a higher late graft survival to be associated with: no acute rejection episodes (risk ratio 0.16, p = 0.0001), age 2-5 years (risk ratio 0.24, p = 0.0007), living donor (risk ratio 0.46, p = 0.017), primary nonrecurrent disease (risk ratio 0.29, p = 0.001), Caucasian race (risk ratio 0.40, p = 0.006). A high halflife was seen with living donor transplant (21.3 years) and the age group 2-5 years (27.5 years). Further, living donor patients with no acute rejection episodes had the best half-life of 37.6 years, while children with hemolytic uremic syndrome, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis or oxalosis had the lowest overall half-life of 5.6 years. This study finds that living donor, no acute rejection episodes, age 2-5 years, Caucasian race and having a disease not prone to recurrence are strong predictors of late graft survival. Hence, preferential use of living donor and prevention of acute rejection episodes in the first year are key variables that can improve long-term renal graft survival in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)939-945
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume2
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2002

Keywords

  • Graft survival
  • Half-life
  • Long-term
  • Pediatric
  • Predictors
  • Renal transplantation

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