Implementing conservation of life across the curriculum

Richard A. Davis, James A. Klein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

At the University of Minnesota Duluth, the Chemical Engineering Department faculty has significant industry experience that includes industry training in the practice of chemical process safety (CPS). As a faculty, we value CPS instruction in our curriculum foremost because we do not want our graduates to get hurt or hurt other people. Regardless of the nature of industries that employs our graduates, or whatever future engineering assignments or roles they may take on, there are benefits to student's exposure to CPS principles. Lessons learned from historical accidents and recent incidents remind us of the value of informing our students about their role in CPS. Starting now to develop a mindset or culture of CPS will help our graduates integrate into any organization's management of chemical process safety. The more knowledge our students have, the less likely there will be serious incidents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEducation - Core Programming Topic at the 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting
PublisherAIChE
Pages432-441
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781618397256
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes
EventEducation - Core Programming Topic at the 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting - Minneapolis, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2011Oct 21 2011

Publication series

NameEducation - Core Programming Topic at the 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting

Other

OtherEducation - Core Programming Topic at the 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis
Period10/16/1110/21/11

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