Impact orientation invariant robot design

An approach to projectile deployed robotic platforms

Ian Burt, Andrew Drenner, Casey Carlson, Apostolos D. Kottas, Nikolaos P Papanikolopoulos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Within the fields of law enforcement and Urban Search and Rescue, there is always a need to obtain information from areas that may be hard to reach or unsafe to enter. One method of obtaining this reconnaissance information is to deploy a robot as a projectile. This may be accomplished with mechanical aids or simply by throwing the robot manually. This rapid deployment method has the ability to attain locations inaccessible to other technologies. The miniature nature of the presented design has the ability to operate discreetly and avoid detection, making it desirable for law enforcement. In the case of urban search and rescue, the diminutive form minimizes the impact on potentially unsound structures. During the course of deployment, unexpected impacts and drops are inevitable, generating a need for an impact invariant design. Design decisions to create this system are presented, and experimental validation of design aspects is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2006
Pages2878-2883
Number of pages6
Volume2006
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 2006
Event2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2006 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: May 15 2006May 19 2006

Other

Other2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2006
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period5/15/065/19/06

Fingerprint

Projectiles
Robotics
Robots
Law enforcement

Cite this

Burt, I., Drenner, A., Carlson, C., Kottas, A. D., & Papanikolopoulos, N. P. (2006). Impact orientation invariant robot design: An approach to projectile deployed robotic platforms. In Proceedings 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2006 (Vol. 2006, pp. 2878-2883). [1642138] https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBOT.2006.1642138

Impact orientation invariant robot design : An approach to projectile deployed robotic platforms. / Burt, Ian; Drenner, Andrew; Carlson, Casey; Kottas, Apostolos D.; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos P.

Proceedings 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2006. Vol. 2006 2006. p. 2878-2883 1642138.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Burt, I, Drenner, A, Carlson, C, Kottas, AD & Papanikolopoulos, NP 2006, Impact orientation invariant robot design: An approach to projectile deployed robotic platforms. in Proceedings 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2006. vol. 2006, 1642138, pp. 2878-2883, 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2006, Orlando, FL, United States, 5/15/06. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBOT.2006.1642138
Burt I, Drenner A, Carlson C, Kottas AD, Papanikolopoulos NP. Impact orientation invariant robot design: An approach to projectile deployed robotic platforms. In Proceedings 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2006. Vol. 2006. 2006. p. 2878-2883. 1642138 https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBOT.2006.1642138
Burt, Ian ; Drenner, Andrew ; Carlson, Casey ; Kottas, Apostolos D. ; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos P. / Impact orientation invariant robot design : An approach to projectile deployed robotic platforms. Proceedings 2006 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2006. Vol. 2006 2006. pp. 2878-2883
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