Impact of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection on patient outcomes

Elizabeth B. Hirsch, Vincent H. Tam

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

214 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rates of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are increasing worldwide. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype in P. aeruginosa could be mediated by several mechanisms including multidrug efflux systems, enzyme production, outer membrane protein (porin) loss and target mutations. Currently, no international consensus on the definition of multidrug resistance exists, making direct comparison of the literature difficult. Inappropriate empirical therapy has been associated with increased mortality in P. aeruginosa infections; delays in starting appropriate therapy may contribute to increased length of hospital stay and persistence of infection. In addition, worse clinical outcomes may be associated with MDR infections owing to limited effective antimicrobial options. This article aims to summarize the contemporary literature on patient outcomes following infections caused by drug-resistant P. aeruginosa. The impact of antimicrobial therapy on patient outcomes, mortality and morbidity; and the economic impact of MDR P. aeruginosa infections will be examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-451
Number of pages11
JournalExpert Review of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

Keywords

  • antipseudomonal agents
  • infection
  • morbidity
  • mortality
  • outcomes
  • resistance
  • virulence

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