Impact of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Identifying the Etiology of Cardiomyopathy in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Transplantation

Lucy Q. Lin, Felipe Kazmirczak, Ko Hsuan Amy Chen, Osama Okasha, Prabhjot S Nijjar, Cindy M Martin, Mehmet Akcakaya, Afshin Farzaneh-Far, Chetan N Shenoy

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5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Errors in identifying the etiology of cardiomyopathy have been described in patients undergoing cardiac transplantation. There are increasing data that cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) provides unique diagnostic information in heart failure. We investigated the association of the performance of CMR prior to cardiac transplantation with rates of errors in identifying the etiology of cardiomyopathy. We compared pre-transplantation clinical diagnoses with post-transplantation pathology diagnoses obtained from the explanted native hearts. Among 338 patients, there were 23 (7%) errors in identifying the etiology of cardiomyopathy. Of these, 22 (96%) occurred in patients with pre-transplantation clinical diagnoses of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). Only 61/338 (18%) had CMRs prior to transplantation. There was no significant association between the performance of CMR and errors in the entire study cohort (p = 0.093). Among patients with pre-transplantation clinical diagnoses of NICM, there was a significant inverse association between the performance of CMR and errors (2.4% vs. 14.6% in patients with and without CMR respectively; p = 0.030). In conclusion, CMR was underutilized prior to cardiac transplantation. In patients with pre-transplantation clinical diagnoses of NICM – in whom 96% of errors in identifying the etiology of cardiomyopathy occurred – the performance of CMR was associated with significantly fewer errors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number16212
JournalScientific reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Mehmet Akçakaya was supported by NIH grant R00HL111410. Chetan Shenoy was supported by NIH grant K23HL132011, University of Minnesota Clinical and Translational Science Institute KL2 Scholars Career Development Program Award (NIH grant KL2TR000113-05) and NIH grant UL1TR000114.

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